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Feature: JOMEC Journal no. 12

We’re happy to announce that JOMEC Journal no. 12 is now available at: https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ . JOMEC Journal is an online, Open Access and peer-reviewed journal interested in highest-quality innovative academic work in the fields of journalism, media and cultural studies.  

In contrast to previous issues, we decided to make an exception and do an open issue that wouldn’t be dedicated to a specific theme. The submissions we received were fascinating, along with the surprising connections we found between them. 

The issue begins with an editorial, and the seven articles that follow can be divided into two groups.

The first group takes us on a fascinating cultural studies journey through China: its ancient sexual practices, queering singlehood to queer filmmaking. Douglas Wile’s Debaters of the bedchamber: China reexamines ancient sexual practices addresses the ancient art of the bedchamber and traditional sex practices in China, a subject of controversy for more than two thousand years. Queering singlehood in mainland China by Benny Lim and Samson Tang discusses singlehood in relation to traditional Chinese culture, suggesting that state-backed media encourages marriage and stigmatizes those who don’t conform to this direction in life. From “celluloid comrades” to “digital video activism”: queer filmmaking in postsocialist China by Hongwei Bao gives a rich historical overview of Chinese ‘new queer cinema’ in the postsocialist era. It identifies a turn from an ambiguous portrayal of queer people by heterosexual filmmakers to an active participation of LGBTQ members in the production of film portrayals of their own lives.

After these China-focused articles, the next four papers belong to the field of media and journalism studies. Antje Glück’s Do emotions fit the frame? A critical appraisal of visual framing research approaches focuses on television news and asks whether the concept of visual framing can be enriched by the integration of emotive elements. It argues that emotions can best be conceptualised as a frame element. The conclusion discusses the extent to which they are suitable for analysing emotions in the visual. Garrisi and Johanssen’s Competing narratives in framing disability in the UK media uses discourse analysis to compare and contrast the journalistic coverage of the story of a beauty blogger with facial disfigurement with that of her own work on her blog. It examines the extent to which a self-representational account may align with the journalistic coverage, showing that journalism and blogging can play a complementary role in shaping society’s understanding of the issue. Press coverage of the debate that followed the News of the World phone hacking scandal: the use of sources in journalistic metadiscourse by Binakuromo Ogbebor uses content and discourse analyses of news articles on the press reform debate that followed this scandal. The author has found that press coverage of media policy debates is characterised by a doubly narrow spectrum of sources. The final article, “Spying for the people”: surveillance, democracy and the impasse of cynical reason by Michael Kaplan, examines the Snowden affair as a sort of Rorschach test that traces the contours of what the author calls ‘the impasse of cynical reason’.

Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal and to find our call for papers: https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ 

Paul Bowman and Petra Kovacevic

 

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Reflections on work experience with a student-led journal

 

In this post, recent graduates Shaffi Batchelor and Mustafa Abdimalik tell us what it’s really like to work on the editorial team of the British Student Doctor Journal.  Shaffi’s role is Education Section Editor and Mustafa’s is Editorial Assistant.  You can download articles from the journal free of charge at: https://thebsdj.cardiffuniversitypress.org/


 I have always had a love of written language: it’s one of the reasons I spent three years reading English at the University of York prior to studying medicine. After graduating and feeling that I had left the arts behind during the course of studying medicine, the opportunity to become involved with the British Student Doctor Journal felt like a breath of fresh air.

I have been genuinely humbled by the scope and quality of the submissions that I have been called to review as Education Section Editor. For all that we frequently dismiss our own actions as being those of “mere” medical students, the depth, nuance and innovation that I have been privileged enough to see have all reassured me that my peers are the worthy successors to a long tradition of medical development and clinical research, one that has never before been so forward-thinking or exciting.
On a personal note, it has been enlightening to gain first-hand insight into the process of peer review, both as reviewer and editor. I find that I now have a greater appreciation for the many individuals involved in creating spaces where research and discourse can flourish, with our own BSDJ as just one example. 

I have definitely learned a great deal over the past two years as Section Editor, and now happily consider myself a champion of both the peer review process and student-led endeavours; with both, we are collectively working towards something far grander than ourselves.

Shafqat Batchelor


I first heard about the journal almost a year and a half ago. I was fascinated by the idea of a journal made and dedicated by students. To be honest, I knew very little about how to write a piece well (whether research article or reflection) and what happens after you submit it. All that changed when I expressed interest in working for the BSDJ.

Initially and for six months, I started as a peer reviewer. I still have and enjoy that role as it has provided me with insight into the process from submission to publication. Subsequently, I applied to work for the journal as peer review manager. The role involves managing peer review applications, updating the peer review database and helping section editors to identify peer reviewers during busy periods. 

I try to answer emails as promptly as possible and stay in contact with section editors to ensure articles are reviewed in a timely manner. With other work and life commitments, it is crucial to stay organised and maintain good communication on a regular basis with section editors. I have found the role both exciting and challenging at times. The work demands of the journal are not huge or difficult, but require attention and dedication.

I am grateful for the experience I have had with the journal. I believe it has improved many aspects of my academic development that are not often explored during clinical practice. I am also grateful to the amazing team we have. To sum it up, it is an experience that has been both educational and sociable.  

Mustafa Abdimalik

 

 

 

CardiffUP adds value!

Cardiff University Press is proud to be contributing to the University’s strategic vision of “continuous improvement of infrastructure to underpin the production of excellent research with impact”.

How do we do that? By:

  • Providing a sustainable online platform for high-quality Cardiff University journals and other publications
    We currently have 8 journals regularly publishing with us, and another 2 to be launched in the near future. We’ll also be starting to publish 2 working paper series this year. Do you have a proposal for another journal or series that we could add to our portfolio? Let us know at cardiffuniversitypress@cardiff.ac.uk if so!
  • Launching innovative publications using a fully Open Access ‘Diamond’ model of publishing
    Our Diamond OA model, meaning no charges to readers for downloading our publications and no charges to authors and editors for publishing with us, has been applied to all our journals and series. No other institutional publisher in the UK does this quite like we do, although UCL Press in London is a fully Open Access publisher too.
  • Relaunching established publications using a specialist Open Scholarship publishing platform (Ubiquity Press)
    In 2017 we teamed up with Ubiquity Press, also based in London, who created a new online space for us on their platform. Our publications have now been relaunched there to provide an improved service to our readers, authors and editorial teams.
  • Providing opportunities for monograph publication to add to the Open Access journals and series published through the Press
    We’re now piloting the publication of monographs, in the hope that we can offer this service more extensively in future. Exciting times!
  • Improving the IT and publishing skills of academic staff and students
    In addition to training staff and students to use our publishing platform, we’re planning an external training session soon which will focus on copy-editing and proofreading skills.
  • Professionalising students and enhancing their employability
    We offer students opportunities to gain work experience with us in a variety of different roles. These roles range from book reviewers, proofreaders and social media publicists to journal editors and student reps on the Editorial Board of the Press itself. Experience of this kind, and the skills gained from it, look amazing on a student’s CV and could lead to a fascinating career after graduation. Unsurprisingly, our work experience opportunities are much in demand!

    Follow this blog for updates….

Five ways to find out more about CardiffUP

  1. Browse our website

    You can find us at https://cardiffuniversitypress.org/ , where you can choose whether to view our pages in English or Welsh. Take a look at the About page for our Vision and Mission statements, a list of our Aims and details of our Editorial Board membership. You can also download all of our publications to date, free of charge, via the Journals and Series pages. The Publish with Us and Research Integrity pages have useful information on our procedures, guidelines and standards. You can also submit academic papers online for consideration by our editorial teams, or apply to become a peer reviewer of other people’s work.

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Feature: Journal of Late Antique Religion and Culture volume 11 – Javier Martínez & Patricia González

The latest article from the Journal of Late Antique Religion and Culture (JLARC), entitled “Knowledge and specialised trades in the late antique West: medicine vs engineering”, was published on 8th January. Its authors Javier Martínez and Patricia González compare and contrast the trades of medicine and engineering in the Roman world, and provide a theory as to why the Romans’ medical skills were mostly passed on to later generations while their engineering skills were soon lost.

Read the whole article at: https://jlarc.cardiffuniversitypress.org/articles/abstract/10.18573/j.2017.10451/

The high degree of technical and scientific development accomplished in the Roman world is quite staggering. The construction of concrete vaults still standing today, and unsurpassed until the Modern period, is proof of their engineering skills. Similarly, Roman medics were capable of practising eye surgery and embryotomies on patients who survived such interventions. However, with the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West during the long fifth century and the emergence of Christianity, popular imagination sees these two sciences collapsing into the Dark Ages. While this is not absolutely true, it is not completely false either. In the Iberian and Gaulish examples we analyse in this paper, we want to put forward how engineering all but disappeared, while Roman medicine continued and was preserved through the Middle Ages and into modern times.
Complex techniques and specialised instruments, including vaulting and levelling, seem to have been lost in sixth- and seventh-century constructions. All new buildings are much simpler in design and techniques, even if built to large scale, because the problem was not the lack of skilled builders but the lack of trained engineers and architects who could do the necessary calculations. The specific example of aqueducts and their abandonment, and the way new churches were built, serve to illustrate this point. In medicine, however, there is a clear continuity of old Roman practices during late antiquity, partly promoted and protected by the Church. Only a few specific elements and tools seem to have been lost, while most generic and specialised sets of knowledge continued.
We propose that some of the reasons behind these diverting paths in the two sciences reside in the way these sets of specialised knowledge had been transmitted in the Roman world, underlining the weakness of Roman overspecialisation. Engineering was taught either through the army or through private apprenticeship systems, was limited almost entirely to men, and flourished during the periods of economic bonanza when large projects were carried out. The Roman elites would have a certain knowledge of construction and architecture basics as part of their cursus honorum, but this was never proper training – the engineer was not a socially privileged position. In this way, once the Empire collapsed, the army disbanded, and large building projects came to an end until the late sixth century. By then all chains of training in the West seem to have been terminally disrupted (as opposed to what happened in the Roman East). Medicine, on the other hand, was a very developed science, but it was not concentrated in a few hands. Army medics and surgeons existed, but they were not the only ones: municipal medics, trained slaves, herbalists, midwives, priests, even perfume makers, all shared fractions of the vast corpus of Roman medical science. It was accessible to men and women, and it was kept in high social esteem as well, so the transmission of medical knowledge was not as limited as engineering and not tied to the fate of the Empire.

JLARC

Feature: Welsh Economic Review volume 25

This most recent volume contains six interesting and diverse papers. 

The first paper, by Holtham and Huggins, explores the factors which are associated with regional economic development and prosperity, using data on over 450 regional economies from around the world. One result in particular is highlighted – that education expenditures are strongly associated with regional success.  For regions with relatively low gross value-added and productivity, the most important factor was found to be expenditure on primary and secondary education, while for higher prosperity regions, spending on higher education was found to be more important.

The paper by Henley and Lang explores the rise in self-employment in Wales, and considers whether this is related to growth in the so called ‘gig-economy’. The authors recognise that the emergence of internet platform-based businesses, such as Uber and Deliveroo, have resulted in pressure on some to work on an insecure self-employed basis. However they conclude that the gig-economy is only one part of a more complex story, and that self-employed business owners continue to form the majority of the self-employed, both across the UK and in Wales.

The experiences of people who participated in training programmes supported by the European Social Fund (ESF) in Wales are investigated in the paper by Davies et al. The training programmes are considered to have possibly succeeded less well in supporting some of the most vulnerable groups within the labour market, such as relatively young participants, with low levels of educational attainment. However, generally the ESF programmes are considered to have helped address some of the essential skills issues within the Welsh economy. 

The paper by Henderson reports on the initial findings from an ongoing research project to examine the economic impacts associated with business adoption and use of superfast broadband and enabled digital technologies. The findings to date indicate that firms using superfast broadband and digital technologies reported greater labour productivity and innovation rates.

The scale and characteristics of tourism foreign direct investment (FDI) in Wales are examined in the paper by Xu. Tourism was estimated to account for around 3.4% of total direct Welsh GVA in 2013, with 86,500 full-time equivalent jobs estimated to be in tourism industries. UK and overseas-owned tourism businesses were found to supply just over half of all tourism services and products in Wales, with these tourism businesses also having levels of productivity compared with domestically-owned businesses.

The final article in this volume is by Daglish et al.  This paper examines election issues, political party performance and geography. The authors discuss three factors that were important in influencing voting behaviour, and in shaping the result of the 2015 general election: perceived relative importance of election issues, expected performance of parties on each election issue, and the trade-off between election issues. The authors suggest that the Liberal Democrats lost significant vote share because of voters’ perceptions of their performance on the contemporary election issues.

This volume is freely available online at https://wer.cardiffuniversitypress.org/14/volume/25/issue/0/

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Discovering more Open Access resources

At Cardiff University Press we’ve always been proud of our status as a 100% Open Access (OA) publisher, providing free and unrestricted access to our publications for anyone with an internet connection. But we’re just a small part of the OA revolution: there’s a huge range of other academic content openly available, with countless new publications being added every day.  Here are some ideas for other OA collections you may like to explore, put together in a neat guide by our colleagues in the University’s Open Access team.

Do have a browse through what these sites have to offer! Worldwide access to high-quality information, at no cost, available 24/7 – what’s not to love?

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