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A new chapter: CardiffUP gets bookish

Today is CardiffUP’s fourth birthday – the official launch of the Press was on 9th July 2015.  We’ve come a long way since that launch event, when we had 2 journals in our portfolio (there are now 12 of them) and 8 people on our Editorial Board (now 18).  Find out more about these on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/journals/ and https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/about/ respectively.

Two weeks ago we reached another publishing milestone, when our very first book was published on our website.  Like the CardiffUP journals, this is free to read and download, thanks to our Open Access policy.  You can find it at https://doi.org/10.18573/book1 and download it to your desktop or any mobile device, including smartphones and Kindles.  A print-on-demand paperback edition will also be available to order from our site shortly.

The book, Deconstructing Martial Arts by Cardiff University’s Professor Paul Bowman, examines different definitions of “martial arts” and their place in culture and society.  If you’d like to tell us what you think about this book and its subject matter, please feel free to add your comments at the bottom of the web page, or Tweet them with a mention of us @CUopenresearch .

From the earliest days of CardiffUP, the intention always was for it to become a monograph publisher eventually, as well as a journal publisher.  As we expected, publishing monographs has proved to be rather more complex, so we’ve taken plenty of time to get ready and set it up.  There are currently three more monograph titles going through the publication process, which should all appear by early 2020.  We’re happy to receive further submissions of monograph manuscripts at any time – guidelines and instructions for submitting these are on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/publish/ .  All academic staff and PhD students are welcome to submit manuscripts to us, whether they’re affiliated to Cardiff University or any other recognised higher education institutions throughout the world.

If you’re a Cardiff University author with a manuscript that needs a publisher, this summer is a particularly good time to submit it to us, as we’re offering a small number of Cardiff University Press Awards.  These Awards, known as “the Diemwnts” after our dragon mascot Diemwnt, will cover most of the publication costs of a limited number of monographs by Cardiff University authors, subject to our approval of the selected monograph manuscripts for publication after peer review. Further details of the Awards will follow later this month, so watch out for those!

PB monograph screenshot

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Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 7

We’re happy to announce that Martial Arts Studies issue 7 is now freely available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/9/volume/0/issue/7/ . Martial Arts Studies is the premier scholarly source for interdisciplinary work on a variety of topics surrounding the practice, sociology, history and media representation of the modern combat sports and traditional martial arts. Published twice yearly, it presents the best research written and reviewed by leaders in the field.

This issue contains an editorial, five articles and three short reviews. The editorial starts by discussing what an “open issue,” such as this one, suggests about the current state of martial arts studies.  The editors note that issue 7 stretches the discussion of the Asian martial arts in geographic terms, and contemplates many complex interactions between physical practice and identity formation.

In their article “The creation of Wing Tsun: a German case study,” Swen Koerner, Mario S. Staller and Benjamin N. Judkins take a detailed look at the global spread of Wing Chun, a hand combat style of kung fu from Guangdong Province.

Next, Kristin Behr and Peter Kuhn examine the “Key factors in career development and transitions in German elite combat sport athletes.” The purpose of their study was to identify factors that facilitate and constrain career development and career transitions. They conclude that an athletic career is a highly complex, multi-layered and individual process.

In the third article, “Fighting gender stereotypes: women’s participation in the martial arts, physical feminism and social change“, Maya Maor explores the social conditions that facilitate gender subversive appropriation in full-contact martial arts, in terms of: 1. close and reciprocal bodily contact, 2. learning new embodiment regimes, and 3. effects of male dominance in the field.

Veronika Partikova continues the ongoing discussion of martial arts and identity formation in “Psychological collectivism in traditional martial arts.” Her paper argues that ‘traditional’ martial arts offer physical skills, moral codes, rituals, roles and hierarchical relationships which, taken together, create the perfect environment for psychological collectivism.

Tim Trausch’s paper “Martial arts and media culture in the information era: glocalization, heterotopia, hyperculture” is derived from the Editor’s Introduction to the collection Chinese martial arts and media culture: global perspectives [Rowman & Littlefield International, 2018]. It argues that recent media texts reflect and (re)produce three paradigms of martial arts and media culture in the information age: glocalization, heterotopia, and hyperculture.

In the review section of this issue, Andreas Niehaus, Leo Istas and Martin Meyer report on the 8th Conference of the German Society of Sport Science’s Committee for Martial Arts Studies, for which the theme was “Experiencing, training and thinking the body in martial arts and martial sports.” Then Spencer Bennington reflects on Udo Moening’s volume Taekwondo: from a martial art to a martial sport. Finally, Qays Stetkevych provides a candid review and close reading of the recently-published Martial arts studies reader [Rowman & Littlefield, 2018].

As always, this issue is freely available online. To find the latest calls for papers and learn more about the journal, go to http://masjournal.org.uk
MAS

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Cardiff University Press’ review of 2018

Happy New Year!  The last year has been very busy for Cardiff University Press, with lots of changes, challenges and new adventures.  Here’s a summary of what we’ve been up to.

  • In January, although it seems an age ago now, five of us were interviewed by Terry Morrell of ARK about our work with the Press. You can see extracts from the interviews on our YouTube channel (featured on this blog in August).
  • In February we said farewell to Sonja Haerkoenen, our Scholarly Publications Manager, who has returned to her native Germany to work at the University of Augsburg, Bavaria (read her final post on this blog here). The duties of Sonja’s role have been shared between Helen Sharp and Dr Alison Weightman of the University Library Service.
  • In March Prof Ben Hannigan was appointed as Chair of our Monograph Commissioning Panel, a new group to manage the submission, peer review and approval processes for our academic monograph publications. On the same day, an academic book manuscript entitled Deconstructing Martial Arts was submitted to us which will become our first published monograph in 2019.  Having made its way through peer reviews and Panel discussions, it was officially approved for publication by our Editorial Board in December.
  • In May we also approved the publication of our first conference proceedings volume, which will contain the adjunct papers from a computer studies conference held in September 2019.
  • In July our Editor-in-Chief Prof Paul Bowman succeeded Prof Damian Walford Davies as Chair of the Editorial Board, after Damian became a Pro Vice-Chancellor of Cardiff University.
  • In August we appointed three new Student Representatives to the Editorial Board, one from each of Cardiff University’s Colleges, ensuring that the student voice within Cardiff University Press is stronger than ever before.
  • In September a new publication, the Journal of Corpora and Discourse Studies, was launched on our online platform. Later that month we hosted a one-day introductory course on copyediting and proofreading, led by the Society for Editors and Proofreaders.
  • In November two more Cardiff University academics joined the Editorial Board, increasing the membership to 19 people (our biggest ever). The Monograph Commissioning Panel held its first official meeting, and another journal title was launched: the Journal of Antipoetry Studies/Revista de Estudios Antipoéticos (our first bilingual journal, publishing both English and Spanish papers). 
  • In December the first Cardiff University Press Annual Report was finalised and distributed in infographic format. One of Cardiff University Press’ founders, University Librarian Janet Peters, took early retirement and has been replaced on the Editorial Board by Tracey Stanley, the Acting University Librarian. In the week before Christmas we published the 30th anniversary issue of the Welsh Economic Review, our oldest journal – and, as mentioned above, our first monograph was approved for publication.

Phew!  We’ve come a long way in the last year, and 2019 promises to be even more eventful, with (among other things) the long-anticipated publication of our first monograph titles. Onwards and upwards…

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Feature: JOMEC Journal no. 12

We’re happy to announce that JOMEC Journal no. 12 is now available at: https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ . JOMEC Journal is an online, Open Access and peer-reviewed journal interested in highest-quality innovative academic work in the fields of journalism, media and cultural studies.  

In contrast to previous issues, we decided to make an exception and do an open issue that wouldn’t be dedicated to a specific theme. The submissions we received were fascinating, along with the surprising connections we found between them. 

The issue begins with an editorial, and the seven articles that follow can be divided into two groups.

The first group takes us on a fascinating cultural studies journey through China: its ancient sexual practices, queering singlehood to queer filmmaking. Douglas Wile’s Debaters of the bedchamber: China reexamines ancient sexual practices addresses the ancient art of the bedchamber and traditional sex practices in China, a subject of controversy for more than two thousand years. Queering singlehood in mainland China by Benny Lim and Samson Tang discusses singlehood in relation to traditional Chinese culture, suggesting that state-backed media encourages marriage and stigmatizes those who don’t conform to this direction in life. From “celluloid comrades” to “digital video activism”: queer filmmaking in postsocialist China by Hongwei Bao gives a rich historical overview of Chinese ‘new queer cinema’ in the postsocialist era. It identifies a turn from an ambiguous portrayal of queer people by heterosexual filmmakers to an active participation of LGBTQ members in the production of film portrayals of their own lives.

After these China-focused articles, the next four papers belong to the field of media and journalism studies. Antje Glück’s Do emotions fit the frame? A critical appraisal of visual framing research approaches focuses on television news and asks whether the concept of visual framing can be enriched by the integration of emotive elements. It argues that emotions can best be conceptualised as a frame element. The conclusion discusses the extent to which they are suitable for analysing emotions in the visual. Garrisi and Johanssen’s Competing narratives in framing disability in the UK media uses discourse analysis to compare and contrast the journalistic coverage of the story of a beauty blogger with facial disfigurement with that of her own work on her blog. It examines the extent to which a self-representational account may align with the journalistic coverage, showing that journalism and blogging can play a complementary role in shaping society’s understanding of the issue. Press coverage of the debate that followed the News of the World phone hacking scandal: the use of sources in journalistic metadiscourse by Binakuromo Ogbebor uses content and discourse analyses of news articles on the press reform debate that followed this scandal. The author has found that press coverage of media policy debates is characterised by a doubly narrow spectrum of sources. The final article, “Spying for the people”: surveillance, democracy and the impasse of cynical reason by Michael Kaplan, examines the Snowden affair as a sort of Rorschach test that traces the contours of what the author calls ‘the impasse of cynical reason’.

Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal and to find our call for papers: https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ 

Paul Bowman and Petra Kovacevic

 

JOMEC Journal logo

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Diemwnt goes walkabout!

Some of you may be familiar with Diemwnt, CardiffUP’s official mascot, who is a knitted dragon.

The name Diemwnt is the Welsh word for “diamond”, which was chosen because of our Diamond Open Access policy for journal publication. You can read more about this policy on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/research-integrity/ .

Our bi-monthly Editorial Board meetings are an essential fixture in Diemwnt’s diary, as it’s vital that our most important Board member is present to oversee the proceedings. But apart from that, until recently our mascot has tended to stay in the CardiffUP office in Newport Road, and hasn’t got out much. Times are changing, however, and the profile of the Press is starting to be raised within Cardiff University and elsewhere. This means that Diemwnt has finally started to explore and go on exciting adventures.

On 24th May, CardiffUP had a presence at the biennial Cardiff Business School Research Fair, held in the Postgraduate Teaching Centre on the University’s Cathays campus. This Fair was a special one, marking the Business School’s 30th anniversary. As you can see from the photo, Diemwnt grabbed the prime spot on the library stand – conveniently close to the tin of free chocolates.

After another trip to the Arts & Social Studies Library for the latest Board meeting, Diemwnt’s next engagement was the University Library Service’s Awayday for library support staff on 5th June. This event included a presentation by CardiffUP’s Executive Officer, Alice Percival, on the Press and its external engagement activities. Diemwnt made a number of new friends at the Awayday and helped Alice to introduce CardiffUP to a new audience.

So what does the future have in store for our intrepid mascot? Well, over the next six months (and on into 2019), CardiffUP is likely to develop rapidly, broadening its activities and becoming better known as a high quality institutional publisher. As a result, we expect that Diemwnt’s travels will continue.

Follow us on Twitter @CardiffUniPress, as well as on this blog, to find out what happens next!
#DiemwntDragon