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A new chapter: CardiffUP gets bookish

Today is CardiffUP’s fourth birthday – the official launch of the Press was on 9th July 2015.  We’ve come a long way since that launch event, when we had 2 journals in our portfolio (there are now 12 of them) and 8 people on our Editorial Board (now 18).  Find out more about these on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/journals/ and https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/about/ respectively.

Two weeks ago we reached another publishing milestone, when our very first book was published on our website.  Like the CardiffUP journals, this is free to read and download, thanks to our Open Access policy.  You can find it at https://doi.org/10.18573/book1 and download it to your desktop or any mobile device, including smartphones and Kindles.  A print-on-demand paperback edition will also be available to order from our site shortly.

The book, Deconstructing Martial Arts by Cardiff University’s Professor Paul Bowman, examines different definitions of “martial arts” and their place in culture and society.  If you’d like to tell us what you think about this book and its subject matter, please feel free to add your comments at the bottom of the web page, or Tweet them with a mention of us @CUopenresearch .

From the earliest days of CardiffUP, the intention always was for it to become a monograph publisher eventually, as well as a journal publisher.  As we expected, publishing monographs has proved to be rather more complex, so we’ve taken plenty of time to get ready and set it up.  There are currently three more monograph titles going through the publication process, which should all appear by early 2020.  We’re happy to receive further submissions of monograph manuscripts at any time – guidelines and instructions for submitting these are on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/publish/ .  All academic staff and PhD students are welcome to submit manuscripts to us, whether they’re affiliated to Cardiff University or any other recognised higher education institutions throughout the world.

If you’re a Cardiff University author with a manuscript that needs a publisher, this summer is a particularly good time to submit it to us, as we’re offering a small number of Cardiff University Press Awards.  These Awards, known as “the Diemwnts” after our dragon mascot Diemwnt, will cover most of the publication costs of a limited number of monographs by Cardiff University authors, subject to our approval of the selected monograph manuscripts for publication after peer review. Further details of the Awards will follow later this month, so watch out for those!

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Open Access and us

Today is the first day of International Open Access Week (http://www.openacessweek.org/ ), an annual celebration of all things “OA”.  We at Cardiff University Press have supported OA Week each year since we launched in 2015.  We’ve always been a 100% OA publisher – it’s part of what we do.  But how do we define the “Open Access” concept, and what does that mean for our readers and authors?

Cardiff University’s OA policy defines OA as “a publishing model that enables peer reviewed articles to be freely available for anyone with access to the internet, rather than limiting readership to subscribers only. It opens up academic research to everyone and is strongly supported by the UK Government as a driver for economic regeneration”.

The most obvious benefits to you as a reader are that OA publications are free of charge. Someone else has paid for the publishing costs, so you don’t have to! But if you’re also an author, publishing your work via OA routes, you have lots of extra advantages. Here are just a few:

  • In addition to making our publications available via the Press website, we deposit all of them in ORCA, Cardiff University’s OA institutional repository – whether they’re by Cardiff University members or not. This means we can help you to get your research noticed: ORCA preserves the publications for the future and makes them easier to find, as well as increasing their citation rate (how often they’re quoted) in many cases.

  • OA publications are openly available for anyone with an internet connection to read, potentially creating a much bigger readership than if they were non-OA. This can strengthen links with external communities and make it easier for the research findings to have an impact in the wider world. Our usage statistics show that CardiffUP publications are read not only in the UK but also in countries around the globe, most frequently in the United States, India, France and Brazil.

  • Many major funders of academic research require OA for any publications based on that research. The next Research Assessment Exercise (REF), which determines how UK Government funding for universities is distributed, will require all journal articles and conference proceedings submitted for assessment to be OA. Authors publishing papers of this type with us can rest assured that the OA requirement has been taken care of.

To celebrate Open Access Week, CardiffUP’s Executive Officer Alice Percival will present a talk entitled “Cardiff University Press: get involved, get published” on Thursday 25 October. Open to all Cardiff University staff and students, the talk includes information on working with and publishing with the Press. It’ll be of particular interest to early career researchers and PhD students. Contact mailto:openaccess@cardiff.ac.uk for more details, or to book a seat.

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CardiffUP adds value!

Cardiff University Press is proud to be contributing to the University’s strategic vision of “continuous improvement of infrastructure to underpin the production of excellent research with impact”.

How do we do that? By:

  • Providing a sustainable online platform for high-quality Cardiff University journals and other publications
    We currently have 8 journals regularly publishing with us, and another 2 to be launched in the near future. We’ll also be starting to publish 2 working paper series this year. Do you have a proposal for another journal or series that we could add to our portfolio? Let us know at cardiffuniversitypress@cardiff.ac.uk if so!
  • Launching innovative publications using a fully Open Access ‘Diamond’ model of publishing
    Our Diamond OA model, meaning no charges to readers for downloading our publications and no charges to authors and editors for publishing with us, has been applied to all our journals and series. No other institutional publisher in the UK does this quite like we do, although UCL Press in London is a fully Open Access publisher too.
  • Relaunching established publications using a specialist Open Scholarship publishing platform (Ubiquity Press)
    In 2017 we teamed up with Ubiquity Press, also based in London, who created a new online space for us on their platform. Our publications have now been relaunched there to provide an improved service to our readers, authors and editorial teams.
  • Providing opportunities for monograph publication to add to the Open Access journals and series published through the Press
    We’re now piloting the publication of monographs, in the hope that we can offer this service more extensively in future. Exciting times!
  • Improving the IT and publishing skills of academic staff and students
    In addition to training staff and students to use our publishing platform, we’re planning an external training session soon which will focus on copy-editing and proofreading skills.
  • Professionalising students and enhancing their employability
    We offer students opportunities to gain work experience with us in a variety of different roles. These roles range from book reviewers, proofreaders and social media publicists to journal editors and student reps on the Editorial Board of the Press itself. Experience of this kind, and the skills gained from it, look amazing on a student’s CV and could lead to a fascinating career after graduation. Unsurprisingly, our work experience opportunities are much in demand!

    Follow this blog for updates….

Innovative publishing (ad)ventures: My experience of managing Cardiff University Press

In my capacity as Scholarly Publications Manager I have had the privilege to manage Cardiff University Press, our Diamond Open Access online publishing house, for the past 2.5 years.

During this time, we’ve grown from 5 to 12 titles, have moved from our initial open source hosting platform to a professional platform provider and have prepared the ground for launching monograph publishing. We have hosted events, registered our Open Access archiving policies on Sherpa Romeo and started depositing our content on Portico for preservation.

Managing a Press has been a new experience for me, and a steep learning curve, but I have thoroughly enjoyed the challenge! The Cardiff University Press Editorial Board includes enthusiastic academic staff and students from a range of Schools and Colleges. This has allowed me to draw on their expertise and diverse perspectives on many areas of publishing, shaping our strategy, vision and mission for the Press. 

It’s been an absolute pleasure seeing the Press grow and develop and being part of this journey. I have learned a lot during my time with the Press, but if I had to summarise what has helped me most it would be these points below:

  1. Get the basics right at the start (workflows, policies, contracts), i.e. walk before you run
  2. Be open to change and adapt what you are doing, and how you are doing it
  3. Take your editors with you – keep them informed and supported along the way
  4. Be realistic and pragmatic – unless you have unlimited resources you will need to make important decisions on where your limits are
  5. Keep your enthusiasm – it’s vital!

I look forward to following Cardiff University Press and its next exciting steps from afar!

 

Sonja Haerkoenen

No.-23

Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 5

We are pleased to announce that Martial Arts Studies no. 5 is now available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Martial Arts Studies is the premier scholarly source for interdisciplinary work on a variety of topics surrounding the practice, sociology, history and media representation of the modern combat sports and traditional martial arts. Published twice yearly, it presents the best research written and reviewed by leaders in the field.  

This issue begins with an editorial discussion, followed by five articles and three book reviews. The editorial asks how we as scholars can demonstrate to colleagues that the martial arts, and by extension martial arts studies, really matter. 
In Affective Mythologies and “The Notorious” Conor McGregor, Darren Kelsey asks what role mysticism, and the notion of the ‘monomyth’, might have played in the career of one of MMA’s most successful and famous fighters. He finds that it is probably impossible to understand this without tackling the role of mysticism, myth and ideology in popular culture. 

The second paper takes us to the kung fu schools of Singapore’s red-light district. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork in ‘Hong Shen Choy Li Fut’ kung fu, anthropologist D. S. Farrer asks searching questions about the purpose and outcome of taolu (also known as ‘sets’, ‘forms’, or ‘kata’) training in traditional Chinese martial arts. 

In the third paper, Thomas, Lugo, Channon and Spence investigate The Influence of Competitive Co-action on Kata Performance in Japanese Karate. Their paper adds to the literature on ‘social facilitation’ within competitive sports by demonstrating that co-action has a notable impact on measurable outcomes within the martial arts. 
Martin Minarik then discusses the relationship between theatrical performance, social values and the martial arts in Ideological Efficacy Before Martial Efficacy. While his basic findings are likely broadly applicable, in this paper Minarik focuses on Japanese gendai budo.

The final research article in the issue is Tales of a Tireur: Being a Savate Teacher in Contemporary Britain.  Produced by the practitioner/scholar team of Southwood and Delamont, this paper offers an ethnographic examination of the classes and career of one of the UK’s top Savate instructors.  The paper is also important as Savate (popular in France, Belgium and Eastern Europe) has been neglected in the English language martial arts studies literature. 

In the first of three book reviews, Emelyne Godfrey provides an assessment of Wendy Rouse’s recent volume Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement (New York UP, 2017). Russell Alexander Stepp brings his own medievalist background to bear in an examination of Daniel Jacquet, Karin Verelst and Timothy Dawson’s (eds.) Late Medieval and Early Modern Fightbooks (Brill, 2016). Finally Craig Owen reviews Embodying Brazil: An Ethnography of Diaspora Capoeira by Sara Delamont, Neil Stephens and Claudio Campos (Routledge, 2017). He also asks important questions about the role of video and other media sources in academic publishing.

As always, this issue is freely available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal or to find our call for papers. https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ and http://masjournal.org.uk/

MAS

Discovering more Open Access resources

At Cardiff University Press we’ve always been proud of our status as a 100% Open Access (OA) publisher, providing free and unrestricted access to our publications for anyone with an internet connection. But we’re just a small part of the OA revolution: there’s a huge range of other academic content openly available, with countless new publications being added every day.  Here are some ideas for other OA collections you may like to explore, put together in a neat guide by our colleagues in the University’s Open Access team.

Do have a browse through what these sites have to offer! Worldwide access to high-quality information, at no cost, available 24/7 – what’s not to love?

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Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 4 – Prof Lauren Miller Griffith

In the second of our two posts showcasing articles from issue 4 of Martial Arts Studies, Lauren Miller Griffith’s article “Virtually legitimate: using disembodied media to position oneself in an embodied community” examines how comments posted on YouTube training videos are providing encouragement for new practitioners of the Brazilian martial art of capoeira.

Read the whole article at: https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/articles/abstract/10.18573/j.2017.10185/

““Quebra, moça,” the master said to me as he shook me by the shoulders. Break, girl. I was too closed, too cold, and had the habitus of a ballerina rather than a capoeirista. Training in Brazil, I could see and feel how each of our bodies were being remade according to the demands of this martial art, which demands walking a careful line between using proper form and cultivating a unique personal aesthetic. I was in Brazil for academic research on how non-Brazilians gain legitimacy within local capoeira academies, and about half of the class comprised foreigners. For them, it wasn’t just face-to-face instruction that they deemed necessary for success in the genre, it was face-to-face instruction in the homeland of capoeira. But not everyone is fortunate enough to be able to do this. Although capoeira has become more common throughout the world, there are still places where aspiring students may not be able to find a teacher. And for some students who do live nearby an instructor, the potential embarrassment of trying something new in front of other people can be a barrier to participation. For both of these groups, the Internet can be a useful resource.

Because my teacher in Brazil repeatedly told us that doing capoeira properly required sentimento (feeling), which is something you can’t learn from books or videos, I expected to find that the comment sections of YouTube videos on capoeira would be full of exhortations to find a ‘real’ teacher or take a ‘real’ class. Instead, using textual analysis of comments that had been left on tutorial videos, I uncovered an interesting pattern. Aspiring or novice capoeiristas would express vulnerability regarding their ability to do a move or play capoeira at all. This was often met with a hostile or homophobic comment from someone else, who did not appear to be a capoeirista. When this happened, another commenter would identify him or herself as a community insider, diffuse the ‘trolling,’ and encourage the original poster by telling him/her that anyone can do capoeira if they work hard enough. Rather than being disparaged as an inferior learning tool, online resources are being used by some capoeiristas as a way of inviting newcomers and geographically isolated students into the embodied community.”

MAS