Innovative publishing (ad)ventures: My experience of managing Cardiff University Press

In my capacity as Scholarly Publications Manager I have had the privilege to manage Cardiff University Press, our Diamond Open Access online publishing house, for the past 2.5 years.

During this time, we’ve grown from 5 to 12 titles, have moved from our initial open source hosting platform to a professional platform provider and have prepared the ground for launching monograph publishing. We have hosted events, registered our Open Access archiving policies on Sherpa Romeo and started depositing our content on Portico for preservation.

Managing a Press has been a new experience for me, and a steep learning curve, but I have thoroughly enjoyed the challenge! The Cardiff University Press Editorial Board includes enthusiastic academic staff and students from a range of Schools and Colleges. This has allowed me to draw on their expertise and diverse perspectives on many areas of publishing, shaping our strategy, vision and mission for the Press. 

It’s been an absolute pleasure seeing the Press grow and develop and being part of this journey. I have learned a lot during my time with the Press, but if I had to summarise what has helped me most it would be these points below:

  1. Get the basics right at the start (workflows, policies, contracts), i.e. walk before you run
  2. Be open to change and adapt what you are doing, and how you are doing it
  3. Take your editors with you – keep them informed and supported along the way
  4. Be realistic and pragmatic – unless you have unlimited resources you will need to make important decisions on where your limits are
  5. Keep your enthusiasm – it’s vital!

I look forward to following Cardiff University Press and its next exciting steps from afar!

 

Sonja Haerkoenen

No.-23

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Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 5

We are pleased to announce that Martial Arts Studies no. 5 is now available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Martial Arts Studies is the premier scholarly source for interdisciplinary work on a variety of topics surrounding the practice, sociology, history and media representation of the modern combat sports and traditional martial arts. Published twice yearly, it presents the best research written and reviewed by leaders in the field.  

This issue begins with an editorial discussion, followed by five articles and three book reviews. The editorial asks how we as scholars can demonstrate to colleagues that the martial arts, and by extension martial arts studies, really matter. 
In Affective Mythologies and “The Notorious” Conor McGregor, Darren Kelsey asks what role mysticism, and the notion of the ‘monomyth’, might have played in the career of one of MMA’s most successful and famous fighters. He finds that it is probably impossible to understand this without tackling the role of mysticism, myth and ideology in popular culture. 

The second paper takes us to the kung fu schools of Singapore’s red-light district. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork in ‘Hong Shen Choy Li Fut’ kung fu, anthropologist D. S. Farrer asks searching questions about the purpose and outcome of taolu (also known as ‘sets’, ‘forms’, or ‘kata’) training in traditional Chinese martial arts. 

In the third paper, Thomas, Lugo, Channon and Spence investigate The Influence of Competitive Co-action on Kata Performance in Japanese Karate. Their paper adds to the literature on ‘social facilitation’ within competitive sports by demonstrating that co-action has a notable impact on measurable outcomes within the martial arts. 
Martin Minarik then discusses the relationship between theatrical performance, social values and the martial arts in Ideological Efficacy Before Martial Efficacy. While his basic findings are likely broadly applicable, in this paper Minarik focuses on Japanese gendai budo.

The final research article in the issue is Tales of a Tireur: Being a Savate Teacher in Contemporary Britain.  Produced by the practitioner/scholar team of Southwood and Delamont, this paper offers an ethnographic examination of the classes and career of one of the UK’s top Savate instructors.  The paper is also important as Savate (popular in France, Belgium and Eastern Europe) has been neglected in the English language martial arts studies literature. 

In the first of three book reviews, Emelyne Godfrey provides an assessment of Wendy Rouse’s recent volume Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement (New York UP, 2017). Russell Alexander Stepp brings his own medievalist background to bear in an examination of Daniel Jacquet, Karin Verelst and Timothy Dawson’s (eds.) Late Medieval and Early Modern Fightbooks (Brill, 2016). Finally Craig Owen reviews Embodying Brazil: An Ethnography of Diaspora Capoeira by Sara Delamont, Neil Stephens and Claudio Campos (Routledge, 2017). He also asks important questions about the role of video and other media sources in academic publishing.

As always, this issue is freely available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal or to find our call for papers. https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ and http://masjournal.org.uk/

MAS

Cardiff University Press’ Review of 2017

As we begin 2018, we’ve been looking back at our activities over the last 12 months. It was certainly an eventful year for us! Here are some highlights:

  • In January, we focussed our attention on our mission to support the professionalisation of students. Harriet Gordon and Evelina Kazakevičiūtė, who are both studying for their PhDs at Cardiff University, were welcomed onto the Press Editorial Board as our first ever Student Representatives.  We also conducted an informal survey among our editorial teams to find out more about aspects of student engagement in our publications. At the end of the month, our newest student-led journal was launched – The British Student Doctor.
  • In March, we received final confirmation that funding had been approved to establish monograph printing. We spent the next few months assessing suppliers against our needs.
  • In April, the journal Asian Literature and Translation was relaunched as a Cardiff University Press title. Three days later we accepted two new titles for publication: the Journal of Corpora and Discourse Studies and our first series of working papers, the Design Research Working Paper Series.  As a result, all three Cardiff University Colleges were represented in our publications portfolio for the very first time.
  • In May, we held our fascinating and very enjoyable Publications Showcase and first Editors’ Forum, bringing together representatives from all of our editorial teams in one place.
  • In June, we had another journal relaunch, with the first issue of Romantic Textualities to be published by the Press.
  • In July, we signed our Partner Press contract with Ubiquity Press.
  • In October, our portfolio of publications and our website were successfully transferred over to the Ubiquity Press hosting platform. We also launched this blog!
  • In December, we accepted a second working paper series for publication, Attic Inscriptions in UK Collections. We were also pleased to welcome a new member to our Editorial Board: Dr Dylan Foster Evans, Head of the School of Welsh here at Cardiff University.

2018 is undoubtedly going to be just as busy, with lots of new things happening. We’ll keep you informed on this blog site!

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Season’s Greetings from our blog family

If you’re following this blog, you may be interested to know that it has some close relatives! Three of the Cardiff University Press journals have their own blog sites, which are run by members of their editorial teams. There is also the Cardiff University Open Access team blog, which is very relevant to us as an Open Access publisher.

https://www.bsdj.org.uk/blog
“The Editor’s Blog” of The British Student Doctor Journal was created in September 2016.  It discusses ethical matters relating to medicine and publishing, and provides fascinating insights from the editors and section editors on how the journal is run.

https://mastudiesrn.wordpress.com/
This is the blog of the Martial Arts Studies Research Network, where the idea of our Martial Arts Studies journal was first conceived. It highlights new academic publications on martial arts, and provides detailed information on the Network’s popular annual conference and other activities.

http://www.romtext.org.uk/blog/
The Romantic Textualities blog is the longest-standing member of our family, having been set up in March 2013. A wide variety of Romantic literature topics (and bloggers) are represented, often with in-depth discussions taking place over a series of posts.

https://cardiffunioa.wordpress.com/
The Cardiff University Open Access blog was launched in International Open Access week 2017. Maintained by the University Library Service’s Open Access Team, the blog provides useful advice and news about Open Access, both at Cardiff University and externally.

Why not follow one or more of our blog family members, to keep yourself up to date with the latest developments in their areas of interest? Happy reading!

The Cardiff University Press team wishes you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Nadolig Llawen a Blwyddyn Newydd Dda!

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Our ethical publishing guidelines

As part of Cardiff University Press’ partnership with Ubiquity Press, we’ve adopted the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

COPE was established in 1997 by a small group of journal editors in the UK, but now has over 12,000 members worldwide from all academic fields. Membership is open to editors of academic journals and others interested in publication ethics.

COPE advises publishers like ourselves, as well as the editors of individual journals and series, on a variety of ethical matters relating to publication. Its ethical publishing guidelines ensure a high standard of integrity, accountability and transparency in any publication activities, particularly with regard to the peer review process. Other ethical issues include plagiarism, copyright, or commercial use of content.

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Student volunteering opportunities – your chance to work with the Press

Are you a Cardiff University student who’s interested in working with us? We’re always on the lookout for enthusiastic students who can make a difference to what we do. In fact, you can see on our website that Cardiff University Press aims to support the professionalisation of Cardiff University students by connecting them to our editorial teams who can offer work experience.

Student working

In other words, we give students the chance to work alongside some of our editors to create and publish academic outputs, so that they can learn transferable skills and improve their employability for their future careers. If you have an ambition to work in academia and/or in publishing, this is a great place to start acquiring the necessary knowledge. You can plan the work around your studies, and in most cases it can be done remotely, without the need to stay on campus. 

Here are some of the ways that students can get involved:

  • Copy editing or proof reading of newly-submitted papers
  • Editing/co-editing student-led journals
  • Writing and submitting book reviews and conference reviews for publication
  • Writing and submitting papers for publication
  • Helping to design and lay out new journal issues and working papers
  • Maintaining web pages on external sites of our publications
  • Uploading back issues to the official Cardiff University Press website, as needed
  • Using social media to promote and raise awareness of our publications
  • Contributing guest posts for this blog
  • Serving as student representatives on the individual editorial panels of our publications
  • Serving as student representatives on our Editorial Board

Interested? Watch this space! As we have recently had a lot of applications from students wanting to volunteer for the Press we are currently not taking any further details, but we may call on you again in the future! Thank you so much for your interest!

Feature: JOMEC Journal no. 11 – “Diaspora beyond nationalism”

This is the first in a series of posts designed to introduce you to some of the journals and series we publish.

Read on for an introduction to JOMEC Journal no. 11, a special issue entitled “Diaspora Beyond Nationalism”, which was published in July 2017. This piece is written by Dr Idil Osman, guest editor of the special issue. You can find the issue at https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/15/volume/0/issue/11/

Population movements across borders are not a new phenomenon. But in the 21st century we have seen a significant shift in scope of international migration and rapid advancement of transportation and communication, making today’s world far more interconnected. Movements of such scale are bound to have substantial political, economic and social consequences.

Globalisation has also facilitated the rapid increase in transnationally available alternative media, which is supported by the advancement of a globally connected technological infrastructure.

The potential of alternative media was brought home in the first half of 2011, when revolutionary uprisings swept North Africa and the Middle East, which quickly came to be known as the Arab Spring. These uprisings saw the exits of two heads of states, Mubarak in Egypt and Ben Ali in Tunisia, and a political shake-up across the Arab inhabited lands. The Arab Spring is an indication of the palpable role social and new media can play in mobilising for political and social change. The Internet, along with mobile phones and digital video, enables people to organise politics in ways that overcome limits of time, space, identity and ideology, resulting in the expansion and coordination of activities that are unlikely to occur using other means.

This special issue addresses and engages these matters with articles that capture them from wide perspectives. It has been developed from a selection of exemplary papers that emerged from the Diaspora Beyond Nationalism conference, held in September 2015 at Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. The issue also includes exceptional papers that were submitted after the conference took place. The papers showcase exciting and original scholarship from across a range of academic disciplines and theoretical perspectives, sharing concerns about the social, cultural and political significance of migration and diaspora communities in a range of national and transnational contexts. Their common thread is the notion of shifting identities, their flexibility in realignment and reconstruction amidst changing tides, means and circumstances, which expand far beyond notions of national identities.

We hope you enjoy reading the papers as much as we have enjoyed putting them together in this topical issue.