CardiffUP’s new monograph – Educators of Healthcare Professionals: Agreeing a Shared Purpose

This post is written by guest blogger Julie Browne, the lead author of the monograph.

Good teamwork is essential to good patient care and, as the COVID-19 crisis has shown, healthcare teams must be able to work together effectively, regardless of who’s on the team, the nature of the healthcare need or the setting.  A major effort is underway across higher education and the NHS to help healthcare staff learn interprofessional teamworking skills, but much more is needed. 

The authors of CardiffUP’s latest monograph turn the spotlight on the hidden players in all this – the educators themselves.  These teachers are found at all levels of the healthcare service, in all professions and specialities including academic and management settings, in clinical skills centres and GP surgeries.  How well are they trained and prepared to work with teachers from other specialities to facilitate the learning of multiprofessional groups of students, trainees and professionals? Disappointingly, the short answer is “hardly at all”.

Healthcare educators usually learn to teach people from their own profession. Their first teaching job is to mentor and supervise students and trainees from their own profession. They are appraised and rewarded only for their skills in teaching their own profession, and there is very little cross-over. They may not know much about how education works in other professions, and be unprepared for working in educational teams. So what does a radiography teacher have in common with a GP tutor or a nurse preceptor? Or a midwife trainer with a physiotherapy educator?

The authors of this book – themselves a multi-professional team – addressed this question by looking at the standards and guidance that 42 different professional groups set for the development and training of their educators to see what, if anything, they have in common. The short answer this time was “a great deal” – they share a wide range of generic skills and attitudes.  Nine central shared values and 24 activities were identified, after a research process involving hundreds of participants from over 20 healthcare professions. While each profession develops its students, trainees and practitioners in its own way, this book demonstrates conclusively that the fundamental work of the healthcare educator is broadly similar, regardless of clinical speciality or profession. This new insight provides solid academic and theoretical underpinning for multi-professional and interprofessional practice in healthcare education, and offers a new shared perspective on the future for healthcare education and healthcare educators.

Link to read and download the book free of charge

This book will be of interest to all senior educators, education commissioners and managers, other educators looking to improve their educational practice or further develop their careers and a wide range of students interested in educational practice and practices. The content is not only applicable to the United Kingdom but will be of value to many of those involved in the development of quality-based interprofessional education models around the world.

Malcolm Smith
Postgraduate Dental Dean
Health Education England North East

Promoting intersectionality with our new student-led journal

We at CardiffUP are very proud to announce the launch of our new journal, Intersectional Perspectives: Identity, Culture, and Society (IPICS), on 25 October 2021. Along with all our other publications, this is an Open Access title – so you can read and download the launch issue completely free of charge, without embargoes or other restrictions.

The launch is taking place virtually on the first day of International Open Access Week 2021, an annual celebration of the principles of Open Access. This year the theme of OA Week is “It matters how we open knowledge: building structural equity.” An introductory blog post from the organisers of the event states:

“Diversity, equity, and inclusion must be consistently prioritized year-round and integrated into the fabric of the open community, from how our infrastructure is built to how we organize community discussions to the governance structures we use.”

We’ve been improving our own level of compliance with this requirement since our first publications appeared online, and we’re committed to continuing to do so. We offer publishing opportunities to academics and students across the globe, regardless of how they identify themselves or what their protected group status is, and our publications frequently discuss topics related to disability, sexual orientation, sex, nationality and other protected characteristics. Here are some examples of these publications, including the special issue featured in our previous blog post in May:

Intersectional Perspectives takes this commitment to diversity and inclusion one step further. Intersectionality can be defined as two or more forms of identity or protected characteristics interacting with each other, often creating new types of discrimination or social oppression as a result. The journal will bring intersectionality into the foreground, exploring the representation and construction of identity, sexuality, race and gender in social and cultural texts, discourses, practices and subjectivities, publishing articles that address how these markers of identity challenge or intersect with culture and society.

It’s one of four student-led journals in our journal portfolio, which means that it’s edited and managed by students. The Editor-in-Chief Arwa Al-Mubaddel, and her Associate Editors Beth Pyner and Ethan Evans, are all PhD students in Cardiff University’s School of English, Communication and Philosophy. They are supported and advised by experienced academic and Professional Services staff, some of whom sit on the journal’s Editorial Advisory Board.

Arwa, Beth and Ethan are currently looking to expand their editorial team, so if you’re interested in working for the journal, contact them at intersections@cardiff.ac.uk .

Find out more about the journal

Discover how to submit your work to CardiffUP

BSDJ LGBTQ+ Special Issue Cover

Feature: The British Student Doctor Journal vol. 5 no. 2

We’re very pleased to announce the publication of a particularly significant special issue of The British Student Doctor Journal. We’ve invited the issue’s guest editor, Callum Phillips, to tell us more about it here.

It is a pleasure to be writing this post introducing the LGBTQ+ Special Issue of The British Student Doctor Journal.

This issue has been over a year in the making, born from a frustration with the invisibility and discrimination faced as a non-binary medical student. I hope it will become a symbol of rebellion and queer power. It began with a scribble in a notebook – to platform, to inspire, to educate. The authors who have contributed to the issue represent a wide spectrum of identities and display the strength that lies in diversity. Their work is resonant and impactful, and I hope that they are extremely proud. The issue covers topics such as what doctors need to know about transgender healthcare, the representation of women who have sex with women, queering curriculums, and facilitation of sexual or gender identity disclosure, amongst many others. There are honest and powerful reflections addressing our history, our present, and our future.  

We know the NHS fails its queer patients and medical professionals; that medical education insufficiently addresses queer populations; that our institutions reflect the prejudices of society. It is my hope that we have met the three founding principles from my notebook, and this issue pushes ourselves a little further along the long road of addressing these failings. Queerness should not be relegated to the shadows, it should not have barriers placed in front of it, it is to be celebrated and encouraged.

The bespoke front cover is from an amazing queer artist called JanCarlo Caling. In it, he depicts the huge influence of the LGBTQIA+ community, including icons of varying race and body shapes, showing that there is no one way to be queer, and a refusal to be packaged into a neat label for societies’ comfort. We hope it pays tribute to the legacies of Marsha P. Johnson & Sylvia Rivera, Audre Lorde, and Keith Haring; and celebrates more contemporary icons such as Jamie Windust, Chella Man, and Eddie Ndopa.

I hope that you enjoy reading the LGBTQ+ issue of the BSDJ as much as I have enjoyed its curation and construction. I would like to thank Cardiff University Press for the support we have received to carry out this important piece of work. You can contact me at cphillips@bsdj.org.uk or @medicallum on Twitter. 

Cardiff University Press’ review of 2020

Happy New Year to all our readers and followers!

As an online publisher, CardiffUP has found it relatively straightforward to move to 100% remote working during the COVID-19 pandemic, although there have inevitably been a few challenges along the way. The publication processes for our journals and monographs have continued unabated.  Here are some highlights of our last twelve months:

We’re delighted that some of the monographs and journal articles we’ve published in recent years will be submitted for the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021, demonstrating the excellent quality of academic research in Cardiff University and other higher education institutions across the UK. We look forward to publishing more monographs and articles in 2021: if you’d like to publish with us, please see our web pages for details.

Happy Open Access Week!

This week CardiffUP is celebrating all things Open Access.  International Open Access Week is an annual event, bringing together organisations and individuals from over 100 countries.  The 2020 event started on Monday 19th October and will continue until Sunday 25th October.

We celebrated last year’s event with the launch of our Monograph Publishing Programme.  The first two Open Access monographs to be published as part of the programme were prominently featured on the day – exactly one year ago this Friday, 23rd October.  So it seems timely for us to provide an update of what’s been happening with the programme since then. 

The first two monographs were Deconstructing Martial Arts by Paul Bowman and Like Any Other Woman: the Lived Experience of Gynaecological Cancer by Jac Saorsa with Rebecca Phillips. They’ve been downloaded from our website more than 1,880 times altogether.  Like all Open Access publications, they’re freely available online to read and download – just follow the links.

In May 2020, we published our first volume of conference proceedings, Human Computer Interaction and Emerging Technologies: Adjunct Proceedings from the INTERACT 2019 Workshops.  This is an output of the 17th IFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, organised by the International Federation for Information Processing Technical Committee on Human-Computer Interaction (IFIP TC13).  It contains nearly 50 papers by authors from all over the world, and has been compiled by an international team of co-editors.  This geographical diversity is a characteristic of the INTERACT conferences as a whole: in the words of the co-editors, “With an emphasis on inclusiveness, these conferences work to lower the barriers that prevent people in developing countries from participating in conferences. As a multidisciplinary field, HCI requires interaction and discussion among diverse people with different interests and backgrounds.” In less than six months, the complete volume has been downloaded over 800 times from our website, and single papers have been downloaded almost 750 times in total.

The next CardiffUP monograph is due to be published at the end of November 2020. Reporting on Poverty: News Media Narratives and Third Sector Communications in Wales and Adrodd ar Dlodi: Naratif y Cyfryngau Newyddion a Chyfathrebiadau’r Trydydd Sector yng Nghymru will be simultaneously published as English and Welsh language editions of the same text. Our first monograph for 2021 is Educators of Healthcare Professionals: Agreeing a Shared Purpose, which has been written by a team of Cardiff University and external authors.  We’re expecting several new monograph submissions during the next few months, so we anticipate that 2021 will be a busy year for our Monograph Publishing Programme.

(Cross-posted on our sister blog, Cardiff Open Access)

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Sharing knowledge to fight the virus: part 3

This is our third blog post highlighting freely accessible resources related to COVID-19.  If you’ve missed the first two, you can access the first one here and the second one here.  As before, the links will direct you to authoritative publications, written by experts and available for anyone with an internet connection to read or download.  Please share the resources as widely as possible.

This list includes some resources that were previously accessible only with a subscription or by paying a one-off fee; due to the current pandemic, these resources have been made freely available for the first time.

CORE
https://core.ac.uk/search?q=covid-19
https://core.ac.uk/search?q=coronavirus
Non-profitmaking UK website for Open Access research publications, maintained by the Open University and Jisc. Currently over 19,000 relevant articles on COVID-19 and over 55,000 on coronaviruses generally.

CORD-19: COVID-19 Open Research Dataset
https://www.semanticscholar.org/cord19
Free resource of more than 130,000 scholarly articles about COVID-19, updated daily.  Analytical tools have been developed and made available on the website to help researchers explore the content.  Created by the Semantic Scholar team at the Allen Institute for AI, Seattle, USA, in partnership with leading research groups. Semantic Scholar is a team of researchers and engineers working to reduce information overload in the scientific/technical community.

Academia.edu
https://www.academia.edu/coronavirus-covid-19/papers
Selection of key research papers on COVID-19. “In addition to curated content, it also lists the related reading that [Academia’s] algorithms have found for those papers.” Over 24,500 relevant full-text papers currently available to download.

ResearchGate COVID-19 Research Community
https://www.researchgate.net/community/COVID-19

Online academic research community that can be used “to stay up to date on the latest COVID-19 research as it happens, get help and support others, and contribute to the body of research the international community is using to combat the current crisis”.  Includes papers from more than 78,000 authors, and a useful page of resources and links to other sites.

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE)
https://tinyurl.com/yb4cys53

Search engine providing a broad overview of Open Access academic resources.  A BASE keyword search for COVID-19 will currently find nearly 101,000 sources; nearly 82,000 of these are Open Access.

Epistemonikos/L·OVE Working Group
https://www.epistemonikos.cl/all-about-covid-19/
Systematic reviews, preliminary reports and blog posts on COVID-19 from the Epistemonikos Foundation, a non-profitmaking organisation “working to bring scientific evidence closer to everyone making health decisions”. L·OVE (Living Overview of the Evidence) is Epistemonikos’ platform for maintaining up-to-date scientific evidence for specific health topics.

New England Journal of Medicine/NEJM Group
https://www.nejm.org/coronavirus
“A collection of articles and other resources on the Coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak, including clinical reports, management guidelines, and commentary. All journal content related to the Covid-19 pandemic is freely available.” Other services and content available to subscribers only.

IEEE Xplore
https://tinyurl.com/sepbnyo
COVID-19 related research (articles and standards) “free to access for the duration of the global health crisis, with additional rights for all types of reuse, including full text and data mining, and analysis”.

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Sharing knowledge to fight the virus: part 2

This is our second blog post highlighting freely accessible resources related to COVID-19.  If you’ve missed the first one, you can access it here.  As before, the links will direct you to authoritative publications, written by experts and available for anyone with an internet connection to read or download.  Please share the resources as widely as possible.

This time we’re featuring some of the online collections put together by database suppliers and large academic publishers (listed alphabetically), including some resources that have recently been made freely available for the first time.

Cambridge University Press: Coronavirus Free Access Collection
https://tinyurl.com/wk83x7o
Free access to a growing collection of COVID-19 related research for a limited period (until end of May 2020). Articles in the collection are from journals and Research Review series.

EBSCO: free/expanded-access resources and clinical information on COVID-19
https://www.ebsco.com/covid-19-resources#sect1
https://www.ebsco.com/covid-19-resources#sect2

Website aimed at academic library services,  offering links to a variety of relevant resources.  Some are free to access for a limited period (until end of May or end of June 2020).

Elsevier:
COVID-19 Healthcare Hub
https://covid-19.elsevier.health/

Free access to Elsevier’s relevant evidence-based tools and resources.  Also a series of Expert Insights podcasts, presented by front-line clinicians and providers, and clinical guidelines from health authorities worldwide about diagnosis and treatment.
Novel Coronavirus Information Center
https://www.elsevier.com/connect/coronavirus-information-center

Free health and medical research on the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19.  Divided into sections: Clinical Information, Chinese Language Resources, Research/Drug Discovery, Public Health and Patient Resources.  Includes a link to Elsevier’s full directory of COVID-19 resources.

Emerald: Coronavirus, the management of epidemics and the wider impact on society
https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/promo/coronavirus.htm
Includes relevant Expert Briefings, journal articles and book chapters, free to access until at least the end of the year.  Emerald has “made research on COVID-19 and the management of epidemics and pandemics free for anyone to access and…also made this available with full text and data mining rights to PubMed Central and the World Health Organization repository”. 

Oxford University Press
https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/coronavirus
https://global.oup.com/about/covid19?cc=gb

Free access to research resources on COVID-19, including journal articles and latest updates on human trials of a possible vaccine developed by Oxford University scientists.

Sage Publishing:
https://journals.sagepub.com/coronavirus
Free medical, social and behavioural science journal articles related to COVID-19.

Springer Nature: SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19
https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/campaigns/coronavirus
Freely accessible papers on COVID-19 from Springer Nature journals, along with additional commentaries and relevant books.

https://tinyurl.com/u53h95p
Free research data support service for Springer Nature authors with data relevant to the pandemic.
https://www.nature.com/briefing/signup/
Free daily newsletter, Nature Briefing, including a selection of the latest updates on coronavirus.

Taylor & Francis: COVID-19 microsite
https://taylorandfrancis.com/coronavirus/
Free access to T&F’s journal and book resources on COVID-19.

Wiley: COVID-19 Novel Coronavirus Outbreak resources
https://novel-coronavirus.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
Journal articles:
https://tinyurl.com/sd68xat
Book chapters:  
https://tinyurl.com/wddn9me
Freely accessible resources on COVID-19 – most are made available within 24 hours of publication.

More comprehensive lists of publishers with COVID-19 resource collections, including smaller presses, are available via:

International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC):
https://tinyurl.com/tp57d2d

Jisc:
https://subscriptionsmanager.jisc.ac.uk/about/resources-for-coronavirus-crisis
https://tinyurl.com/y7f5muuj

Wellcome Trust:
https://tinyurl.com/tc8j3up

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Sharing knowledge to fight the virus

The Open Research Team at Cardiff University Library Service, which includes Cardiff University Press, is compiling a list of Open Access resources related to COVID-19. All the links in the list refer to authoritative publications written by experts, and are available for anyone with an internet connection to read or download.

We are doing this because information is power: it can save lives, if it gets to the right people who need it.  Please take a look at the resources and share them widely with whoever you think should read them.

We would like to thank our University colleagues at the Specialist Unit for Review Evidence (SURE) for their invaluable help in compiling the list.  This is the first instalment: we are still adding to the list, so look out for our next blog post. 

LitCovid
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/research/coronavirus/
American portal site from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health.  “…a curated literature hub for tracking up-to-date scientific information about the 2019 novel Coronavirus. The articles are updated daily and are further categorized by different research topics and geographic locations for improved access.” Currently over 3,000 relevant articles, all included in the PubMed database.  Data can be downloaded in  TSV or RIS format.

PubMed Central (PMC)
COVID-19 resources:
https://tinyurl.com/wgbx3lb
General coronavirus resources:
https://tinyurl.com/s7ymjvz
Online collections of resources on COVID-19 and other coronaviruses – co-ordinated by the US National Library of Medicine and representing 40 different academic publishers around the world.

World Health Organisation (WHO) – COVID-19 database
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/global-research-on-novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov
This is updated daily (Monday to Friday) from searches of bibliographic databases, tables of contents of relevant journals, and other relevant scientific articles that come to WHO’s attention.  Articles are searchable by author, keyword (title, author, journal), journal, or general topic, and can be downloaded free of charge. To see the most recently added citations, select “Newest updates”.

Digital Science: Dimensions COVID-19 resources
https://covid-19.dimensions.ai/

Database of relevant resources which can be exported as a spreadsheet and accessed via Google or on Figshare.  Contains research publications, datasets and (via the spreadsheet) clinical trial information.  Updated daily – currently more than 6,600 resources included.  Over two-thirds of resources are Open Access.

Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM): Evidence Service
https://www.cebm.net/covid-19/
Freely accessible summaries of medical evidence to answer specific questions about COVID-19 – updated regularly.

Cochrane Collaboration
Special Collections:
https://www.cochranelibrary.com/special-collections
COVID-19 – Fertility and Pregnancy:
https://cgf.cochrane.org/news/covid-19-coronavirus-disease-fertility-and-pregnancy
Rapid Reviews:
https://www.cochrane.org/cochranes-work-rapid-reviews-response-covid-19
The Cochrane Library medical database is creating Special Collections of systematic reviews on aspects of COVID-19, including Infection control and prevention measures and Evidence relevant to critical care.  The Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group is also collecting important resources, guidance and advice statements on COVID-19, fertility and pregnancy into a spreadsheet which can be downloaded from the website.  Cochrane is currently working on a number of fast-tracked systematic reviews on COVID-19 related topics for its Rapid Reviews series.

F1000Research: Disease Outbreaks gateway site
https://f1000research.com/gateways/disease_outbreaks/coronavirus

Free access to COVID-19 research papers (before, during and after peer review).
“We welcome all types of publications and documents related to coronavirus, including but not limited to: clinical trials, clinical case reports, epidemiological modelling, transmission dynamics, collaboratively written policies, protocols, and any other information that needs to be shared in a timely manner.”

STAY AT HOME – PROTECT THE NHS – SAVE LIVES

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Cardiff University Press’ review of 2019

Happy New Year everyone!

2019 has been an important year for CardiffUP, with several milestones reached and lots to celebrate.  Here are some highlights of our last twelve months:

  • In January we welcomed a new Student Representative onto our Editorial Board – Laura Sinclair, a PhD student from the School of Journalism, Media and Culture. By the end of the year Laura had also become the Student Representative on our Monograph Commissioning Panel.
  • In March the journal SHARE: Studies in History, Archaeology, Religion and Conservation was officially relaunched after a temporary halt in publication.
  • In May we accepted a research report for publication, Reporting on Poverty by Kerry Moore, which is due to be published in spring 2020; and we approved an application for publication from the established and well-respected journal New Readings, which is about to publish its first CardiffUP issue. Also during May, the Editorial Board formally decided to renew our Partner Press Agreement with Ubiquity Press for two more years.
  • In June, we accepted another book for publication – Like Any Other Woman by Jac Saorsa with Rebecca Phillips. Later in the month we were delighted to announce the online publication of our very first monograph Deconstructing Martial Arts by Paul Bowman, with the paperback version following in early July.
  • Also in July, we accepted another established and well-regarded journal for publication – Assuming Gender. At the end of the month we officially launched the CardiffUP Monograph Awards funding scheme, which provides selected Cardiff University authors and editors with financial support to publish monographs with us.
  • In September, our oldest journal Welsh Economic Review became the first CardiffUP title to be accepted for inclusion in the prestigious online Directory of Open Access Journals, which should greatly increase its visibility to the global research community.
  • In October, one of our Monograph Commissioning Panel members joined our Editorial Board too – Julie Browne from the School of Medicine. One week later, having progressed rapidly through its editing and production stages, our second monograph Like Any Other Woman was published.  This was very timely for the official launch event of our Monograph Publishing Scheme, held in International Open Access Week.  At the event, we and our invited guests celebrated the publication of our first two books, listened to speeches and enjoyed some great conversations along with our buffet lunch.
  • In November, Hélène de Ribaupierre from the School of Computer Science and Informatics joined our Editorial Board, becoming the first Board member from the University’s College of Physical Sciences and Engineering.
  • In December, our Editorial Board and Monograph Commissioning Panel met together for the first time to discuss a five-year plan for CardiffUP – we already have plenty of ideas for the future.

In 2020 we look forward to publishing more monographs and journal issues, and to contributing to Cardiff University’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021 submissions where we intend to have some of our publications featured.  It looks like we’ll be having another busy year!

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Celebrating Open Access Week 2019 with CardiffUP’s second book

Just in time for International Open Access Week 2019, Cardiff University Press is delighted to announce the publication of the second book in its new Monograph Publishing Programme.

As with all CardiffUP publications, Like Any Other Woman: The Lived Experience Of Gynaecological Cancer is fully Open Access. Written by Cardiff University’s Dr Jac Saorsa with contributions from Rebecca Phillips, the book provides the reader with a powerful and thought-provoking insight into the physical and emotional experiences of women with cancer. You can download it for free to your desktop or to any mobile device, including smartphones and Kindles. Print-on-demand paperback copies are also available to order from the same web address.

Along with our first published book, Deconstructing Martial Arts by Prof Paul Bowman, Like Any Other Woman is being featured at the official launch event of our Monograph Publishing Programme, which takes place at Cardiff University on Wednesday 23rd October. This is the main event in our celebration of Open Access Week 2019. We’re hoping to Tweet some photos from it afterwards, so look out for those.

What’s coming next in the Monograph Publishing Programme? Well, in the next few months we’ll be publishing our first volume of conference proceedings, and our first bilingual research report (English and Welsh editions). If you’re an academic staff member or PhD student, either at Cardiff University or another recognised higher education institution, and would like to find out more about submitting a monograph manuscript to us, please see the guidelines on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/publish/ . We look forward to hearing from you.

To discover why Open Access is important to us, check out our blog post here: https://cardiffunipress.wordpress.com/2018/10/22/open-access-and-us/

And you can keep up to date with our activities by following our Tweets @CUOpenResearch: we’d be very pleased if you could retweet them!

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