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Sharing knowledge to fight the virus: part 2

This is our second blog post highlighting freely accessible resources related to COVID-19.  If you’ve missed the first one, you can access it here.  As before, the links will direct you to authoritative publications, written by experts and available for anyone with an internet connection to read or download.  Please share the resources as widely as possible.

This time we’re featuring some of the online collections put together by database suppliers and large academic publishers (listed alphabetically), including some resources that have recently been made freely available for the first time.

Cambridge University Press: Coronavirus Free Access Collection
https://tinyurl.com/wk83x7o
Free access to a growing collection of COVID-19 related research for a limited period (until end of May 2020). Articles in the collection are from journals and Research Review series.

EBSCO: free/expanded-access resources and clinical information on COVID-19
https://www.ebsco.com/covid-19-resources#sect1
https://www.ebsco.com/covid-19-resources#sect2

Website aimed at academic library services,  offering links to a variety of relevant resources.  Some are free to access for a limited period (until end of May or end of June 2020).

Elsevier:
COVID-19 Healthcare Hub
https://covid-19.elsevier.health/

Free access to Elsevier’s relevant evidence-based tools and resources.  Also a series of Expert Insights podcasts, presented by front-line clinicians and providers, and clinical guidelines from health authorities worldwide about diagnosis and treatment.
Novel Coronavirus Information Center
https://www.elsevier.com/connect/coronavirus-information-center

Free health and medical research on the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19.  Divided into sections: Clinical Information, Chinese Language Resources, Research/Drug Discovery, Public Health and Patient Resources.  Includes a link to Elsevier’s full directory of COVID-19 resources.

Emerald: Coronavirus, the management of epidemics and the wider impact on society
https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/promo/coronavirus.htm
Includes relevant Expert Briefings, journal articles and book chapters, free to access until at least the end of the year.  Emerald has “made research on COVID-19 and the management of epidemics and pandemics free for anyone to access and…also made this available with full text and data mining rights to PubMed Central and the World Health Organization repository”. 

Oxford University Press
https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/coronavirus
https://global.oup.com/about/covid19?cc=gb

Free access to research resources on COVID-19, including journal articles and latest updates on human trials of a possible vaccine developed by Oxford University scientists.

Sage Publishing:
https://journals.sagepub.com/coronavirus
Free medical, social and behavioural science journal articles related to COVID-19.

Springer Nature: SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19
https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/campaigns/coronavirus
Freely accessible papers on COVID-19 from Springer Nature journals, along with additional commentaries and relevant books.

https://tinyurl.com/u53h95p
Free research data support service for Springer Nature authors with data relevant to the pandemic.
https://www.nature.com/briefing/signup/
Free daily newsletter, Nature Briefing, including a selection of the latest updates on coronavirus.

Taylor & Francis: COVID-19 microsite
https://taylorandfrancis.com/coronavirus/
Free access to T&F’s journal and book resources on COVID-19.

Wiley: COVID-19 Novel Coronavirus Outbreak resources
https://novel-coronavirus.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
Journal articles:
https://tinyurl.com/sd68xat
Book chapters:  
https://tinyurl.com/wddn9me
Freely accessible resources on COVID-19 – most are made available within 24 hours of publication.

More comprehensive lists of publishers with COVID-19 resource collections, including smaller presses, are available via:

International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC):
https://tinyurl.com/tp57d2d

Jisc:
https://subscriptionsmanager.jisc.ac.uk/about/resources-for-coronavirus-crisis
https://tinyurl.com/y7f5muuj

Wellcome Trust:
https://tinyurl.com/tc8j3up

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Cardiff University Press’ review of 2019

Happy New Year everyone!

2019 has been an important year for CardiffUP, with several milestones reached and lots to celebrate.  Here are some highlights of our last twelve months:

  • In January we welcomed a new Student Representative onto our Editorial Board – Laura Sinclair, a PhD student from the School of Journalism, Media and Culture. By the end of the year Laura had also become the Student Representative on our Monograph Commissioning Panel.
  • In March the journal SHARE: Studies in History, Archaeology, Religion and Conservation was officially relaunched after a temporary halt in publication.
  • In May we accepted a research report for publication, Reporting on Poverty by Kerry Moore, which is due to be published in spring 2020; and we approved an application for publication from the established and well-respected journal New Readings, which is about to publish its first CardiffUP issue. Also during May, the Editorial Board formally decided to renew our Partner Press Agreement with Ubiquity Press for two more years.
  • In June, we accepted another book for publication – Like Any Other Woman by Jac Saorsa with Rebecca Phillips. Later in the month we were delighted to announce the online publication of our very first monograph Deconstructing Martial Arts by Paul Bowman, with the paperback version following in early July.
  • Also in July, we accepted another established and well-regarded journal for publication – Assuming Gender. At the end of the month we officially launched the CardiffUP Monograph Awards funding scheme, which provides selected Cardiff University authors and editors with financial support to publish monographs with us.
  • In September, our oldest journal Welsh Economic Review became the first CardiffUP title to be accepted for inclusion in the prestigious online Directory of Open Access Journals, which should greatly increase its visibility to the global research community.
  • In October, one of our Monograph Commissioning Panel members joined our Editorial Board too – Julie Browne from the School of Medicine. One week later, having progressed rapidly through its editing and production stages, our second monograph Like Any Other Woman was published.  This was very timely for the official launch event of our Monograph Publishing Scheme, held in International Open Access Week.  At the event, we and our invited guests celebrated the publication of our first two books, listened to speeches and enjoyed some great conversations along with our buffet lunch.
  • In November, Hélène de Ribaupierre from the School of Computer Science and Informatics joined our Editorial Board, becoming the first Board member from the University’s College of Physical Sciences and Engineering.
  • In December, our Editorial Board and Monograph Commissioning Panel met together for the first time to discuss a five-year plan for CardiffUP – we already have plenty of ideas for the future.

In 2020 we look forward to publishing more monographs and journal issues, and to contributing to Cardiff University’s Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021 submissions where we intend to have some of our publications featured.  It looks like we’ll be having another busy year!

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Celebrating Open Access Week 2019 with CardiffUP’s second book

Just in time for International Open Access Week 2019, Cardiff University Press is delighted to announce the publication of the second book in its new Monograph Publishing Programme.

As with all CardiffUP publications, Like Any Other Woman: The Lived Experience Of Gynaecological Cancer is fully Open Access. Written by Cardiff University’s Dr Jac Saorsa with contributions from Rebecca Phillips, the book provides the reader with a powerful and thought-provoking insight into the physical and emotional experiences of women with cancer. You can download it for free to your desktop or to any mobile device, including smartphones and Kindles. Print-on-demand paperback copies are also available to order from the same web address.

Along with our first published book, Deconstructing Martial Arts by Prof Paul Bowman, Like Any Other Woman is being featured at the official launch event of our Monograph Publishing Programme, which takes place at Cardiff University on Wednesday 23rd October. This is the main event in our celebration of Open Access Week 2019. We’re hoping to Tweet some photos from it afterwards, so look out for those.

What’s coming next in the Monograph Publishing Programme? Well, in the next few months we’ll be publishing our first volume of conference proceedings, and our first bilingual research report (English and Welsh editions). If you’re an academic staff member or PhD student, either at Cardiff University or another recognised higher education institution, and would like to find out more about submitting a monograph manuscript to us, please see the guidelines on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/publish/ . We look forward to hearing from you.

To discover why Open Access is important to us, check out our blog post here: https://cardiffunipress.wordpress.com/2018/10/22/open-access-and-us/

And you can keep up to date with our activities by following our Tweets @CUOpenResearch: we’d be very pleased if you could retweet them!

DiemwntJac'sBook Richard'sphoto

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A new chapter: CardiffUP gets bookish

Today is CardiffUP’s fourth birthday – the official launch of the Press was on 9th July 2015.  We’ve come a long way since that launch event, when we had 2 journals in our portfolio (there are now 12 of them) and 8 people on our Editorial Board (now 18).  Find out more about these on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/journals/ and https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/about/ respectively.

Two weeks ago we reached another publishing milestone, when our very first book was published on our website.  Like the CardiffUP journals, this is free to read and download, thanks to our Open Access policy.  You can find it at https://doi.org/10.18573/book1 and download it to your desktop or any mobile device, including smartphones and Kindles.  A print-on-demand paperback edition will also be available to order from our site shortly.

The book, Deconstructing Martial Arts by Cardiff University’s Professor Paul Bowman, examines different definitions of “martial arts” and their place in culture and society.  If you’d like to tell us what you think about this book and its subject matter, please feel free to add your comments at the bottom of the web page, or Tweet them with a mention of us @CUopenresearch .

From the earliest days of CardiffUP, the intention always was for it to become a monograph publisher eventually, as well as a journal publisher.  As we expected, publishing monographs has proved to be rather more complex, so we’ve taken plenty of time to get ready and set it up.  There are currently three more monograph titles going through the publication process, which should all appear by early 2020.  We’re happy to receive further submissions of monograph manuscripts at any time – guidelines and instructions for submitting these are on our website at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/publish/ .  All academic staff and PhD students are welcome to submit manuscripts to us, whether they’re affiliated to Cardiff University or any other recognised higher education institutions throughout the world.

If you’re a Cardiff University author with a manuscript that needs a publisher, this summer is a particularly good time to submit it to us, as we’re offering a small number of Cardiff University Press Awards.  These Awards, known as “the Diemwnts” after our dragon mascot Diemwnt, will cover most of the publication costs of a limited number of monographs by Cardiff University authors, subject to our approval of the selected monograph manuscripts for publication after peer review. Further details of the Awards will follow later this month, so watch out for those!

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Cardiff University Press’ review of 2018

Happy New Year!  The last year has been very busy for Cardiff University Press, with lots of changes, challenges and new adventures.  Here’s a summary of what we’ve been up to.

  • In January, although it seems an age ago now, five of us were interviewed by Terry Morrell of ARK about our work with the Press. You can see extracts from the interviews on our YouTube channel (featured on this blog in August).
  • In February we said farewell to Sonja Haerkoenen, our Scholarly Publications Manager, who has returned to her native Germany to work at the University of Augsburg, Bavaria (read her final post on this blog here). The duties of Sonja’s role have been shared between Helen Sharp and Dr Alison Weightman of the University Library Service.
  • In March Prof Ben Hannigan was appointed as Chair of our Monograph Commissioning Panel, a new group to manage the submission, peer review and approval processes for our academic monograph publications. On the same day, an academic book manuscript entitled Deconstructing Martial Arts was submitted to us which will become our first published monograph in 2019.  Having made its way through peer reviews and Panel discussions, it was officially approved for publication by our Editorial Board in December.
  • In May we also approved the publication of our first conference proceedings volume, which will contain the adjunct papers from a computer studies conference held in September 2019.
  • In July our Editor-in-Chief Prof Paul Bowman succeeded Prof Damian Walford Davies as Chair of the Editorial Board, after Damian became a Pro Vice-Chancellor of Cardiff University.
  • In August we appointed three new Student Representatives to the Editorial Board, one from each of Cardiff University’s Colleges, ensuring that the student voice within Cardiff University Press is stronger than ever before.
  • In September a new publication, the Journal of Corpora and Discourse Studies, was launched on our online platform. Later that month we hosted a one-day introductory course on copyediting and proofreading, led by the Society for Editors and Proofreaders.
  • In November two more Cardiff University academics joined the Editorial Board, increasing the membership to 19 people (our biggest ever). The Monograph Commissioning Panel held its first official meeting, and another journal title was launched: the Journal of Antipoetry Studies/Revista de Estudios Antipoéticos (our first bilingual journal, publishing both English and Spanish papers). 
  • In December the first Cardiff University Press Annual Report was finalised and distributed in infographic format. One of Cardiff University Press’ founders, University Librarian Janet Peters, took early retirement and has been replaced on the Editorial Board by Tracey Stanley, the Acting University Librarian. In the week before Christmas we published the 30th anniversary issue of the Welsh Economic Review, our oldest journal – and, as mentioned above, our first monograph was approved for publication.

Phew!  We’ve come a long way in the last year, and 2019 promises to be even more eventful, with (among other things) the long-anticipated publication of our first monograph titles. Onwards and upwards…

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Reflections on work experience with a student-led journal

 

In this post, recent graduates Shaffi Batchelor and Mustafa Abdimalik tell us what it’s really like to work on the editorial team of the British Student Doctor Journal.  Shaffi’s role is Education Section Editor and Mustafa’s is Editorial Assistant.  You can download articles from the journal free of charge at: https://thebsdj.cardiffuniversitypress.org/


 I have always had a love of written language: it’s one of the reasons I spent three years reading English at the University of York prior to studying medicine. After graduating and feeling that I had left the arts behind during the course of studying medicine, the opportunity to become involved with the British Student Doctor Journal felt like a breath of fresh air.

I have been genuinely humbled by the scope and quality of the submissions that I have been called to review as Education Section Editor. For all that we frequently dismiss our own actions as being those of “mere” medical students, the depth, nuance and innovation that I have been privileged enough to see have all reassured me that my peers are the worthy successors to a long tradition of medical development and clinical research, one that has never before been so forward-thinking or exciting.
On a personal note, it has been enlightening to gain first-hand insight into the process of peer review, both as reviewer and editor. I find that I now have a greater appreciation for the many individuals involved in creating spaces where research and discourse can flourish, with our own BSDJ as just one example. 

I have definitely learned a great deal over the past two years as Section Editor, and now happily consider myself a champion of both the peer review process and student-led endeavours; with both, we are collectively working towards something far grander than ourselves.

Shafqat Batchelor


I first heard about the journal almost a year and a half ago. I was fascinated by the idea of a journal made and dedicated by students. To be honest, I knew very little about how to write a piece well (whether research article or reflection) and what happens after you submit it. All that changed when I expressed interest in working for the BSDJ.

Initially and for six months, I started as a peer reviewer. I still have and enjoy that role as it has provided me with insight into the process from submission to publication. Subsequently, I applied to work for the journal as peer review manager. The role involves managing peer review applications, updating the peer review database and helping section editors to identify peer reviewers during busy periods. 

I try to answer emails as promptly as possible and stay in contact with section editors to ensure articles are reviewed in a timely manner. With other work and life commitments, it is crucial to stay organised and maintain good communication on a regular basis with section editors. I have found the role both exciting and challenging at times. The work demands of the journal are not huge or difficult, but require attention and dedication.

I am grateful for the experience I have had with the journal. I believe it has improved many aspects of my academic development that are not often explored during clinical practice. I am also grateful to the amazing team we have. To sum it up, it is an experience that has been both educational and sociable.  

Mustafa Abdimalik

 

 

 

CardiffUP adds value!

Cardiff University Press is proud to be contributing to the University’s strategic vision of “continuous improvement of infrastructure to underpin the production of excellent research with impact”.

How do we do that? By:

  • Providing a sustainable online platform for high-quality Cardiff University journals and other publications
    We currently have 8 journals regularly publishing with us, and another 2 to be launched in the near future. We’ll also be starting to publish 2 working paper series this year. Do you have a proposal for another journal or series that we could add to our portfolio? Let us know at cardiffuniversitypress@cardiff.ac.uk if so!
  • Launching innovative publications using a fully Open Access ‘Diamond’ model of publishing
    Our Diamond OA model, meaning no charges to readers for downloading our publications and no charges to authors and editors for publishing with us, has been applied to all our journals and series. No other institutional publisher in the UK does this quite like we do, although UCL Press in London is a fully Open Access publisher too.
  • Relaunching established publications using a specialist Open Scholarship publishing platform (Ubiquity Press)
    In 2017 we teamed up with Ubiquity Press, also based in London, who created a new online space for us on their platform. Our publications have now been relaunched there to provide an improved service to our readers, authors and editorial teams.
  • Providing opportunities for monograph publication to add to the Open Access journals and series published through the Press
    We’re now piloting the publication of monographs, in the hope that we can offer this service more extensively in future. Exciting times!
  • Improving the IT and publishing skills of academic staff and students
    In addition to training staff and students to use our publishing platform, we’re planning an external training session soon which will focus on copy-editing and proofreading skills.
  • Professionalising students and enhancing their employability
    We offer students opportunities to gain work experience with us in a variety of different roles. These roles range from book reviewers, proofreaders and social media publicists to journal editors and student reps on the Editorial Board of the Press itself. Experience of this kind, and the skills gained from it, look amazing on a student’s CV and could lead to a fascinating career after graduation. Unsurprisingly, our work experience opportunities are much in demand!

    Follow this blog for updates….

Innovative publishing (ad)ventures: My experience of managing Cardiff University Press

In my capacity as Scholarly Publications Manager I have had the privilege to manage Cardiff University Press, our Diamond Open Access online publishing house, for the past 2.5 years.

During this time, we’ve grown from 5 to 12 titles, have moved from our initial open source hosting platform to a professional platform provider and have prepared the ground for launching monograph publishing. We have hosted events, registered our Open Access archiving policies on Sherpa Romeo and started depositing our content on Portico for preservation.

Managing a Press has been a new experience for me, and a steep learning curve, but I have thoroughly enjoyed the challenge! The Cardiff University Press Editorial Board includes enthusiastic academic staff and students from a range of Schools and Colleges. This has allowed me to draw on their expertise and diverse perspectives on many areas of publishing, shaping our strategy, vision and mission for the Press. 

It’s been an absolute pleasure seeing the Press grow and develop and being part of this journey. I have learned a lot during my time with the Press, but if I had to summarise what has helped me most it would be these points below:

  1. Get the basics right at the start (workflows, policies, contracts), i.e. walk before you run
  2. Be open to change and adapt what you are doing, and how you are doing it
  3. Take your editors with you – keep them informed and supported along the way
  4. Be realistic and pragmatic – unless you have unlimited resources you will need to make important decisions on where your limits are
  5. Keep your enthusiasm – it’s vital!

I look forward to following Cardiff University Press and its next exciting steps from afar!

 

Sonja Haerkoenen

No.-23

Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 5

We are pleased to announce that Martial Arts Studies no. 5 is now available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Martial Arts Studies is the premier scholarly source for interdisciplinary work on a variety of topics surrounding the practice, sociology, history and media representation of the modern combat sports and traditional martial arts. Published twice yearly, it presents the best research written and reviewed by leaders in the field.  

This issue begins with an editorial discussion, followed by five articles and three book reviews. The editorial asks how we as scholars can demonstrate to colleagues that the martial arts, and by extension martial arts studies, really matter. 
In Affective Mythologies and “The Notorious” Conor McGregor, Darren Kelsey asks what role mysticism, and the notion of the ‘monomyth’, might have played in the career of one of MMA’s most successful and famous fighters. He finds that it is probably impossible to understand this without tackling the role of mysticism, myth and ideology in popular culture. 

The second paper takes us to the kung fu schools of Singapore’s red-light district. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork in ‘Hong Shen Choy Li Fut’ kung fu, anthropologist D. S. Farrer asks searching questions about the purpose and outcome of taolu (also known as ‘sets’, ‘forms’, or ‘kata’) training in traditional Chinese martial arts. 

In the third paper, Thomas, Lugo, Channon and Spence investigate The Influence of Competitive Co-action on Kata Performance in Japanese Karate. Their paper adds to the literature on ‘social facilitation’ within competitive sports by demonstrating that co-action has a notable impact on measurable outcomes within the martial arts. 
Martin Minarik then discusses the relationship between theatrical performance, social values and the martial arts in Ideological Efficacy Before Martial Efficacy. While his basic findings are likely broadly applicable, in this paper Minarik focuses on Japanese gendai budo.

The final research article in the issue is Tales of a Tireur: Being a Savate Teacher in Contemporary Britain.  Produced by the practitioner/scholar team of Southwood and Delamont, this paper offers an ethnographic examination of the classes and career of one of the UK’s top Savate instructors.  The paper is also important as Savate (popular in France, Belgium and Eastern Europe) has been neglected in the English language martial arts studies literature. 

In the first of three book reviews, Emelyne Godfrey provides an assessment of Wendy Rouse’s recent volume Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement (New York UP, 2017). Russell Alexander Stepp brings his own medievalist background to bear in an examination of Daniel Jacquet, Karin Verelst and Timothy Dawson’s (eds.) Late Medieval and Early Modern Fightbooks (Brill, 2016). Finally Craig Owen reviews Embodying Brazil: An Ethnography of Diaspora Capoeira by Sara Delamont, Neil Stephens and Claudio Campos (Routledge, 2017). He also asks important questions about the role of video and other media sources in academic publishing.

As always, this issue is freely available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal or to find our call for papers. https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ and http://masjournal.org.uk/

MAS

Feature: Welsh Economic Review volume 25

This most recent volume contains six interesting and diverse papers. 

The first paper, by Holtham and Huggins, explores the factors which are associated with regional economic development and prosperity, using data on over 450 regional economies from around the world. One result in particular is highlighted – that education expenditures are strongly associated with regional success.  For regions with relatively low gross value-added and productivity, the most important factor was found to be expenditure on primary and secondary education, while for higher prosperity regions, spending on higher education was found to be more important.

The paper by Henley and Lang explores the rise in self-employment in Wales, and considers whether this is related to growth in the so called ‘gig-economy’. The authors recognise that the emergence of internet platform-based businesses, such as Uber and Deliveroo, have resulted in pressure on some to work on an insecure self-employed basis. However they conclude that the gig-economy is only one part of a more complex story, and that self-employed business owners continue to form the majority of the self-employed, both across the UK and in Wales.

The experiences of people who participated in training programmes supported by the European Social Fund (ESF) in Wales are investigated in the paper by Davies et al. The training programmes are considered to have possibly succeeded less well in supporting some of the most vulnerable groups within the labour market, such as relatively young participants, with low levels of educational attainment. However, generally the ESF programmes are considered to have helped address some of the essential skills issues within the Welsh economy. 

The paper by Henderson reports on the initial findings from an ongoing research project to examine the economic impacts associated with business adoption and use of superfast broadband and enabled digital technologies. The findings to date indicate that firms using superfast broadband and digital technologies reported greater labour productivity and innovation rates.

The scale and characteristics of tourism foreign direct investment (FDI) in Wales are examined in the paper by Xu. Tourism was estimated to account for around 3.4% of total direct Welsh GVA in 2013, with 86,500 full-time equivalent jobs estimated to be in tourism industries. UK and overseas-owned tourism businesses were found to supply just over half of all tourism services and products in Wales, with these tourism businesses also having levels of productivity compared with domestically-owned businesses.

The final article in this volume is by Daglish et al.  This paper examines election issues, political party performance and geography. The authors discuss three factors that were important in influencing voting behaviour, and in shaping the result of the 2015 general election: perceived relative importance of election issues, expected performance of parties on each election issue, and the trade-off between election issues. The authors suggest that the Liberal Democrats lost significant vote share because of voters’ perceptions of their performance on the contemporary election issues.

This volume is freely available online at https://wer.cardiffuniversitypress.org/14/volume/25/issue/0/

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