Feature: Martial Arts Studies no. 5

We are pleased to announce that Martial Arts Studies no. 5 is now available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Martial Arts Studies is the premier scholarly source for interdisciplinary work on a variety of topics surrounding the practice, sociology, history and media representation of the modern combat sports and traditional martial arts. Published twice yearly, it presents the best research written and reviewed by leaders in the field.  

This issue begins with an editorial discussion, followed by five articles and three book reviews. The editorial asks how we as scholars can demonstrate to colleagues that the martial arts, and by extension martial arts studies, really matter. 
In Affective Mythologies and “The Notorious” Conor McGregor, Darren Kelsey asks what role mysticism, and the notion of the ‘monomyth’, might have played in the career of one of MMA’s most successful and famous fighters. He finds that it is probably impossible to understand this without tackling the role of mysticism, myth and ideology in popular culture. 

The second paper takes us to the kung fu schools of Singapore’s red-light district. Drawing on his extensive fieldwork in ‘Hong Shen Choy Li Fut’ kung fu, anthropologist D. S. Farrer asks searching questions about the purpose and outcome of taolu (also known as ‘sets’, ‘forms’, or ‘kata’) training in traditional Chinese martial arts. 

In the third paper, Thomas, Lugo, Channon and Spence investigate The Influence of Competitive Co-action on Kata Performance in Japanese Karate. Their paper adds to the literature on ‘social facilitation’ within competitive sports by demonstrating that co-action has a notable impact on measurable outcomes within the martial arts. 
Martin Minarik then discusses the relationship between theatrical performance, social values and the martial arts in Ideological Efficacy Before Martial Efficacy. While his basic findings are likely broadly applicable, in this paper Minarik focuses on Japanese gendai budo.

The final research article in the issue is Tales of a Tireur: Being a Savate Teacher in Contemporary Britain.  Produced by the practitioner/scholar team of Southwood and Delamont, this paper offers an ethnographic examination of the classes and career of one of the UK’s top Savate instructors.  The paper is also important as Savate (popular in France, Belgium and Eastern Europe) has been neglected in the English language martial arts studies literature. 

In the first of three book reviews, Emelyne Godfrey provides an assessment of Wendy Rouse’s recent volume Her Own Hero: The Origins of the Women’s Self-Defense Movement (New York UP, 2017). Russell Alexander Stepp brings his own medievalist background to bear in an examination of Daniel Jacquet, Karin Verelst and Timothy Dawson’s (eds.) Late Medieval and Early Modern Fightbooks (Brill, 2016). Finally Craig Owen reviews Embodying Brazil: An Ethnography of Diaspora Capoeira by Sara Delamont, Neil Stephens and Claudio Campos (Routledge, 2017). He also asks important questions about the role of video and other media sources in academic publishing.

As always, this issue is freely available at https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/6/volume/0/issue/5/. Visit our webpages to learn more about the journal or to find our call for papers. https://mas.cardiffuniversitypress.org/ and http://masjournal.org.uk/

MAS

Feature: Welsh Economic Review volume 25

This most recent volume contains six interesting and diverse papers. 

The first paper, by Holtham and Huggins, explores the factors which are associated with regional economic development and prosperity, using data on over 450 regional economies from around the world. One result in particular is highlighted – that education expenditures are strongly associated with regional success.  For regions with relatively low gross value-added and productivity, the most important factor was found to be expenditure on primary and secondary education, while for higher prosperity regions, spending on higher education was found to be more important.

The paper by Henley and Lang explores the rise in self-employment in Wales, and considers whether this is related to growth in the so called ‘gig-economy’. The authors recognise that the emergence of internet platform-based businesses, such as Uber and Deliveroo, have resulted in pressure on some to work on an insecure self-employed basis. However they conclude that the gig-economy is only one part of a more complex story, and that self-employed business owners continue to form the majority of the self-employed, both across the UK and in Wales.

The experiences of people who participated in training programmes supported by the European Social Fund (ESF) in Wales are investigated in the paper by Davies et al. The training programmes are considered to have possibly succeeded less well in supporting some of the most vulnerable groups within the labour market, such as relatively young participants, with low levels of educational attainment. However, generally the ESF programmes are considered to have helped address some of the essential skills issues within the Welsh economy. 

The paper by Henderson reports on the initial findings from an ongoing research project to examine the economic impacts associated with business adoption and use of superfast broadband and enabled digital technologies. The findings to date indicate that firms using superfast broadband and digital technologies reported greater labour productivity and innovation rates.

The scale and characteristics of tourism foreign direct investment (FDI) in Wales are examined in the paper by Xu. Tourism was estimated to account for around 3.4% of total direct Welsh GVA in 2013, with 86,500 full-time equivalent jobs estimated to be in tourism industries. UK and overseas-owned tourism businesses were found to supply just over half of all tourism services and products in Wales, with these tourism businesses also having levels of productivity compared with domestically-owned businesses.

The final article in this volume is by Daglish et al.  This paper examines election issues, political party performance and geography. The authors discuss three factors that were important in influencing voting behaviour, and in shaping the result of the 2015 general election: perceived relative importance of election issues, expected performance of parties on each election issue, and the trade-off between election issues. The authors suggest that the Liberal Democrats lost significant vote share because of voters’ perceptions of their performance on the contemporary election issues.

This volume is freely available online at https://wer.cardiffuniversitypress.org/14/volume/25/issue/0/

currency-1018220_1920

Our ethical publishing guidelines

As part of Cardiff University Press’ partnership with Ubiquity Press, we’ve adopted the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

COPE was established in 1997 by a small group of journal editors in the UK, but now has over 12,000 members worldwide from all academic fields. Membership is open to editors of academic journals and others interested in publication ethics.

COPE advises publishers like ourselves, as well as the editors of individual journals and series, on a variety of ethical matters relating to publication. Its ethical publishing guidelines ensure a high standard of integrity, accountability and transparency in any publication activities, particularly with regard to the peer review process. Other ethical issues include plagiarism, copyright, or commercial use of content.

ethics

Student volunteering opportunities – your chance to work with the Press

Are you a Cardiff University student who’s interested in working with us? We’re always on the lookout for enthusiastic students who can make a difference to what we do. In fact, you can see on our website that Cardiff University Press aims to support the professionalisation of Cardiff University students by connecting them to our editorial teams who can offer work experience.

Student working

In other words, we give students the chance to work alongside some of our editors to create and publish academic outputs, so that they can learn transferable skills and improve their employability for their future careers. If you have an ambition to work in academia and/or in publishing, this is a great place to start acquiring the necessary knowledge. You can plan the work around your studies, and in most cases it can be done remotely, without the need to stay on campus. 

Here are some of the ways that students can get involved:

  • Copy editing or proof reading of newly-submitted papers
  • Editing/co-editing student-led journals
  • Writing and submitting book reviews and conference reviews for publication
  • Writing and submitting papers for publication
  • Helping to design and lay out new journal issues and working papers
  • Maintaining web pages on external sites of our publications
  • Uploading back issues to the official Cardiff University Press website, as needed
  • Using social media to promote and raise awareness of our publications
  • Contributing guest posts for this blog
  • Serving as student representatives on the individual editorial panels of our publications
  • Serving as student representatives on our Editorial Board

Interested? Watch this space! As we have recently had a lot of applications from students wanting to volunteer for the Press we are currently not taking any further details, but we may call on you again in the future! Thank you so much for your interest!

Feature: JOMEC Journal no. 11 – “Diaspora beyond nationalism”

This is the first in a series of posts designed to introduce you to some of the journals and series we publish.

Read on for an introduction to JOMEC Journal no. 11, a special issue entitled “Diaspora Beyond Nationalism”, which was published in July 2017. This piece is written by Dr Idil Osman, guest editor of the special issue. You can find the issue at https://jomec.cardiffuniversitypress.org/15/volume/0/issue/11/

Population movements across borders are not a new phenomenon. But in the 21st century we have seen a significant shift in scope of international migration and rapid advancement of transportation and communication, making today’s world far more interconnected. Movements of such scale are bound to have substantial political, economic and social consequences.

Globalisation has also facilitated the rapid increase in transnationally available alternative media, which is supported by the advancement of a globally connected technological infrastructure.

The potential of alternative media was brought home in the first half of 2011, when revolutionary uprisings swept North Africa and the Middle East, which quickly came to be known as the Arab Spring. These uprisings saw the exits of two heads of states, Mubarak in Egypt and Ben Ali in Tunisia, and a political shake-up across the Arab inhabited lands. The Arab Spring is an indication of the palpable role social and new media can play in mobilising for political and social change. The Internet, along with mobile phones and digital video, enables people to organise politics in ways that overcome limits of time, space, identity and ideology, resulting in the expansion and coordination of activities that are unlikely to occur using other means.

This special issue addresses and engages these matters with articles that capture them from wide perspectives. It has been developed from a selection of exemplary papers that emerged from the Diaspora Beyond Nationalism conference, held in September 2015 at Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. The issue also includes exceptional papers that were submitted after the conference took place. The papers showcase exciting and original scholarship from across a range of academic disciplines and theoretical perspectives, sharing concerns about the social, cultural and political significance of migration and diaspora communities in a range of national and transnational contexts. Their common thread is the notion of shifting identities, their flexibility in realignment and reconstruction amidst changing tides, means and circumstances, which expand far beyond notions of national identities.

We hope you enjoy reading the papers as much as we have enjoyed putting them together in this topical issue.

Who we are

Prof Damian Walford Davies is Chair of our Editorial Board. Damian is head of the School of English, Communication and Philosophy at Cardiff University, Chair of Literature Wales, and Fellow of the Welsh Academy. He is supported by three other Officers, seven Members and two Student Representatives. For full details of the Board membership, go to our web page at https://www.cardiffuniversitypress.org/site/about/.

Our Board Officers are:

Prof Paul Bowman, Editor-in-Chief. Paul is Professor of Cultural Studies in the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. Within the School, he is Director of the Media, Culture and Creativity Research Group.

Sonja Haerkoenen, Scholarly Publications Manager, Cardiff University Library Service, and University Press Manager. Sonja has responsibility for day-to-day management of Cardiff University Press, and also for the activities of the Library’s Open Access Team.

Alice Percival, Executive Officer of Cardiff University Press. Alice works on a range of Press activities, including the provision of support for the Editorial Teams, and acts as secretary for the Editorial Board.

Meet the team

Come with us on a new adventure!

This is a very exciting time for Cardiff University Press. We’ve just moved to our new hosting platform, provided by Ubiquity Press. This platform will enable us to offer more services to our authors, editors and readers. Our web address remains the same: http://cardiffuniversitypress.org. We hope you like our new home!

The move will also allow us to enter a new phase of development. We’ve always had plans to expand into the area of monograph publishing once our journal publishing had been established. Our new partnership with Ubiquity Press will make that expansion possible, and we’re hoping to launch our monograph publishing activities in early 2018. In the meantime, do contact us to register your interest in publishing a monograph with us.

Watch this space, and share our adventure with us.

CardiffUniPress homepage